Braille Grouping indicators and Standing Alone Rule

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  • #37279
    j.l.ceja760
    Participant

    The list of punctuation and indicator symbols in UEB 2.6.2 does not have the Braille Grouping Indicators listed. Does this prohibit me from using alphabetic wordsigns and other contractions with standing alone rules, next to braille grouping indicators? I have attached an example brailled 2 ways. Which is corrrect?

     

     

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    #37287
    Dan Gergen
    Moderator

    Hello and thank you for your question which was discussed with members of the UEB Literary Committee. We hope our reply is helpful.

    You are correct, grouping indicator symbols as defined in UEB §3.4.1 are not on the list of punctuation and indicators in §2.6.2 that may precede a letter or letters-sequence to be considered as standing alone. Grade 1 indicators are also not on the list. Other opening print grouping signs, such as parentheses, brackets, and curly brackets, in addition to the opening transcriber's note indicator, are listed in 2.6.2.

    As such, the grade 1 indicator followed unspaced by the opening general grouping indicator—neither of which are listed in §2.6.2—prevents the word "It" from standing alone. The second braille example should be used.

    The symbols-sequence example you provided would usually need to be preceded unspaced from the symbol it applies to. The purpose in using braille grouping indicators according to UEB §3.4.1 is to ensure that the preceding braille symbol or indicator applies to all the symbols enclosed by the braille grouping indicators.

    This means that a symbol —not space—would be preceding the opening grouping indicator. To be considered as standing alone, with or without those listed symbols in §2.6.2 it must be preceded by a space. "It" is preceded by the grade 1 indicator and the opening grouping indicator.

    We would be very interested in knowing why your transcription requires the braille grouping indicators. Examples like this are valuable resources for all transcribers who look for answers in the "Ask an Expert" forums. Would you mind sending an image of the print example you are working on? It may shed some light on other possibilities

    Dan Gergen, Chair
    UEB Literary Committee

    #37288
    j.l.ceja760
    Participant

    Thank you so much for the quick reply to this question. I came across this situation while brailling marginal labels. So a 2 letter key followed by a space and then the text enclosed within braille grouping indicators is what is actually in the braille volume I am transcribing.

    The marginal labels appear in an example student essay. I included information I believed would be enough to get the question answered. It seems I did not fully think it out as I should of provided the exact example and all that it entails. I have attached a similar example that has both an alphabetic wordsign and a shortform word that is not standing alone due to the braille grouping indicators. I have omitted text, represented by an ellipsis, for space considerations.  Thanks.

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    #37315
    Dan Gergen
    Moderator

    Thank you for providing a sample of what you are transcribing. It helps us in discussing a proper reply but also introducing a topic for discussion that many transcribers may not know about.

    We consulted a Braille Formats expert and discussed BF §16.11 Keying Technique for Marginal Labels. The expert confirms that you are following the rules correctly for marginal labels. §16.11.1.g describes a very unusual use for braille grouping indicators.
    To answer your original question, based on the UEB rules for "standing alone," the "it" alphabetic wordsign is not permitted since the grade 1 indicator and the opening braille grouping indicator do not appear on the list of punctuation and indicators that may precede a letter or letters-sequence to be considered as standing alone. [UEB §2.6.2]

    Thank you again for your very interesting question. If we can help with any other problem, please don't hesitate to ask an expert.

    Dan Gergen, Chair
    UEB Literary Committee

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Dan Gergen.
    • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Dan Gergen.
    #37327
    j.l.ceja760
    Participant

    Thank you for your thoroughness in getting the question answered Dan!

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