Foriegn words that become Anglicized

Home Forums Foreign Language Foriegn words that become Anglicized

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Kathleen 4 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #11772

    Kathleen
    Participant

    Good afternoon, Joanna!

    I’m working on a music textbook (UEB) in which many terms are introduced in italics and are foreign in origin, but are subsequently used in the text as non-italicized and therefore Anglicized words. Should I use contractions or not? The code seems to be ambiguous (I’ve read chapter 13 several times!!) Should I use the dictionary to help me decide with each term?

    Thanks!
    Kathleen

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #22728

    joannavenneri
    Participant

    I’ll be glad to help. Italics is no longer used to determine if a word is considered foreign and neither is the dictionary. It generally depends on the context, especially when such a word occurs in otherwise English text. It would help if you would please send a scan of a print page where this occurs so that I can see the context.

    Chapter 13 of which code? What source are you referring to? Formats? Interim Manual? Something else?

    –Joanna

    #22729

    joannavenneri
    Participant

    Here’s a pdf of the page – the word “stasimon” is first italicized then not. I am inclined to use contractions.

    I am referring to section 13 of the Rules of Unified English Braille, 2nd edition 2013.

    Thanks, Joanna!

    #22730

    Kathleen
    Participant

    Hi Kathleen,

    I’m sorry–you did say at the beginning that you are working in UEB. The question you have raised is now a gray area in the rules, but I do have a strong recommendation to offer.

    What we have here is English text with foreign language words used within it. These foreign words are considered to be in an English context.

    First, please refer to Braille Formats 2011 section 1.15. Briefly, that is the current practice. It says that foreign words in English context are contracted (except for accented letters, which thankfully does not apply here. There are no accented or Greek letters.) It is the NBA recommendation that this practice be continued at this time. In this case, use contractions and retain the typeforms as in print. If I understand correctly that you are doing this in UEB, use the UEB indicators for the typeforms.

    I know this appears to conflict with UEB section 13 that states no contractions are to be used in foreign words. Please read that section carefully and see Section 13.2.1. It says not to use contractions in foreign words, even in the English context. Be sure to see the note that follows. Note: It is permissible to disregard this rule provided that there are appropriate braille authority policies and guidelines in place which transcribers in your country are expected to follow to ensure that ambiguity is avoided.

    The BANA Braille Formats Technical Committee is working with BANA to align Braille Formats with UEB. Until final approval for this update occurs, current practices continue, and the use of contractions is the current practice. The BANA technical committee has recommended that the note in 13.2.1 be incorporated into Braille Formats so that the current practice of contractions usage continues. Therefore, at this time, the recommendation here is to continue using contractions in the foreign words that you have asked about here.

    –Joanna

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

Everyone is free to read the forums, but only current NBA members can post. Become a member today. Click here to Login and return.