less than and greater than signs

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  rsherwood12 5 years ago.

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  • #11643

    rsherwood12
    Participant

    Hello,

    I posted a separate question in the formats forum about this Italian textbook table of contents. My question here is about specific symbols in one of the entries, and I am wondering if this is a foreign language or spelling convention I’m not familiar with:

    In the entry for Unita 13 in the attached scan, the expression b < > p appears. The directions for the exercise that this refers to state that the answers to the questions all contain a b or a p, which gives a clue as to what the symbols mean. Which braille symbols would I use to represent these: angle brackets? left and right arrowheads?

    Thanks again,
    Rebecca

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    #22476

    joannavenneri
    Participant

    Hi Rebecca,

    Probably arrowheads and this probably means those bi-directional arrows. If at all possible, please send the print page where this appears so I can get a context. I may want to ask around on this one.

    Thanks!

    –Joanna

    #22478

    joannavenneri
    Participant

    Hi Joanna,
    Thank you for responding so promptly to my question. For some reason I didn’t get a notification from the Forum when you replied, so I’m just responding now that I found your response on the Forum.

    As requested, I’m attaching a .pdf of the page with the arrowheads. They appear in the entry for Unita 13. I’m wondering if I should just use the arrowhead symbols $[ and $o and an embedded TN stating that’s what they are. Since there’s no explanation in print, this would be giving the braille reader the same information as the sighted reader. What do you think?

    Thanks much,
    Rebecca

    #22479

    rsherwood12
    Participant

    Very helpful. These FL print things can be quite mysterious because they are often different from what is usually done in English language publications. Read the relevant material here for context just to be sure. I think this means the the b and p are pronounced pretty much like each other, like equivalents. Look at some lessons on this point and see if that is what they seem to be saying. Unless you find something that strongly indicates something else, just go with the bi-directional arrows, embed the TN as you suggested and the braille student now has what the print readers have and they can all ask the teacher together what the heck it means.

    –Joanna

    #22480

    rsherwood12
    Participant

    Arrowheads, not arrows. Which you said and I meant to say. You have the right symbols. I would put those one following the other with no space in between them but spaced away from the b and p. And since the other meaning is “derived from” and “from whence derived” they even starts to make some sense.

    –Joanna

    #22477

    joannavenneri
    Participant

    Great, thank you!

    Rebecca

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