Tables in Nemeth or UEB

Home Forums Nemeth Code for Math and Science Tables in Nemeth or UEB

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  • #29769
    two-three-six
    Participant

    Hello,

    I'm transcribing math worksheets for a middle school student. I'm trying to understand when to use Nemeth and when to use UEB for tables. I've attached a pdf with 3 reference tables.

    #1 For a table with words for column headings and all free-standing, unmodified numbers in the body, would I use UEB for everything?

    #2 For a table that has one thing in the body that's technical material, is the whole body automatically done in Nemeth (uncontracted words and low numbers)? This particular table actually has one fraction in a row heading and one fraction in the body.

    #3 For a table that has some decimals in the body of it, I would do the whole body in Nemeth. For this particular table, would you consider the (x) and (y) to be Nemeth, so that I would do the whole box in Nemeth?

    Thanks very much,

    Greta

     

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    #29775
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Greta,

    Thank you for your questions.

    #1: Yes, for a table that consists of nothing but words and unmodified numbers, it's UEB all the way.

    #2: A table that has one entry that must be in Nemeth Code is not required to have all its rows in Nemeth Code. In the example you provided (where a row heading and an entry both include material that must be in Nemeth Code and there are no column headings) I think I would suggest transcribing the body of the table all in one Nemeth bubble, with the opening Nemeth Code indicator in cell 1 on a line by itself right before the first row and the Nemeth Code terminator in cell 1 on a line by itself after the last row of the table. But I do not believe it would be wrong to enclose the fraction in the row heading in one set of Nemeth Code switch indicators and the fraction in the second column in another set of Nemeth Code switch indicators.

    #3: Our Guidance does not require that (x) in "Number of Sheets (x)" be transcribed in Nemeth Code. So, there is no technical material in the column headings of the third example table you shared. You're quite right that the decimals that make up the second column's entries must be in Nemeth Code. So, you should enclose the row headings and table entries in one Nemeth bubble, with the opening Nemeth Code indicator in cell 1 on a line by itself following the column separation lines and the Nemeth Code terminator in cell 1 on a line by itself after the last row of the table.

    Thank you for your questions! Please let me know if you have any follow-up concerns.

    –Kyle

    #29776
    two-three-six
    Participant

    Kyle, thanks for the answers. That clears up a lot.

    I just have one follow-up example. In the attached table, one column heading has ft squared, in parentheses. I'm guessing I would just use the Nemeth code switch indicators around that and do the rest of the table in UEB, right?

     

    Thanks! Greta

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    #29779
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Yes, I would do as you describe.

    _% (ft^2") _:

    –Kyle

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by kdejute.
    #29783
    two-three-six
    Participant

    Perfect! I think I understand it all now.

    Thanks very much!

    Greta

    #29988
    togilby
    Participant

     

    Kyle, I'm seeking clarification about when the body of a table is considered technical. Until today, I've been transcribing the body of a table in the Nemeth Code if any single entry is of a technical nature. Admittedly, that doesn't happen often, but there are certainly occasions when only a couple of entries contain decimal points, for instance, or there is one sample equation in a fill-in column.

    I've just read your post regarding #2 above ( A table that has one entry that must be in Nemeth Code is not required to have all its rows in Nemeth Code.) and it's made me wonder if I've been sweating thru the process unnecessarily. Is there literally a dividing line between your "one entry" and "table entries" as stated in #6 p.7 of the Guidance? Is it a braillist's prerogative to use Nemeth switches within the body of a table?

    The Guidance is pretty vague with its single paragraph regarding tables. Your guidance is always appreciated!

    Trumbull

     

    #30020
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Trumbull,

    It's true that the Guidance for Transcription Using Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts is not overly specific in regards to tables.

    I certainly cannot say that there is a clear dividing line between transcribing the whole body of a table in Nemeth as opposed to using one or more pairs of Nemeth switch indicators for an individual entry or entries in a table.

    I can attempt to outline a possible decision-making process for table transcription and Nemeth Code use, and I look forward to your thoughts on that. Here's that outline:

    • Does every part of the table need to be in Nemeth Code? If yes, then do it.
    • Does every part of the table's rows need to be in Nemeth Code? If yes, then insert switch indicators after the column separation line and after the last row.
    • Does every entry (not including row headings) need to be in Nemeth Code? If yes, then do as above and treat the row headings as technical material.
    • For any of the above, if the parts under consideration do not all need to be in Nemeth Code, but they are all either: a) material that needs to be in Nemeth Code or b) letter(s) and/or number(s) which could be read easily in either code, then use Nemeth Code as if all the parts under consideration did need to be in Nemeth Code.
    • If one or more table entry is a phrase or something else that is out of place within switch indicators, then experiment with using one or more pairs of Nemeth switch indicators for an individual entry or entries in a table; this may be most reader-friendly in an alternate table format.

    Does that help?

    Your questions are excellent. I look forward to your response.

    Cheers!
    –Kyle

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