TENSES AND THEIR USES

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  claurent 12 months ago.

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  • #31811

    james.hendrix
    Participant

    While going over the 2018 Braille Formats Study Guide A review of Braille Formats: Principles of Print-to-Braille Transcription, 2016 Braille Bit 5 (See below). The Answer Guide shows a <u>starting script indicator</u> before each of the displayed Entries in the Examples: section.

    • <u>Braille Bit 5</u>
    • TENSES AND THEIR USES

    The tense of a verb indicates the time of the action or the

    State of being expressed by the verb.

    The present tense is used mainly to express an action or a state of being that is occurring now.

    The present tense is also used to summarize the plot or subject matter of a literary work or to refer to an author’s relationship to his or her work (such use is called <u>the literary present)</u>. Examples:

    I walk

    I am walk<u>ing</u>

    I walk<u>ed</u>

     

    According to UEB Section 9.9, Rule 9.9.1 which states:

    “When transcribing a typeform passage which extends over more than one text element (e. g. a series of consecutive paragraphs), each text element is preceded by the typeform passage indicator and the typeform is terminated only at the point where the typeform changes.

     

    Is it not correct to begin each displayed scripted paragraph with a <u>starting</u> <u>script passage indicator</u> ending with a script terminator after the last entry? This same usage of the passage indicators is used in the Student’s Lesson 19 (ALSO BY ROBERT REMINI which has a list of all his additional books in italics).

    Thank you,

    Mark A. Brodka

    Grafton Braille Service Center

    Grafton, OH

    #31816

    claurent
    Moderator

    Thank you for bringing this to my attention.

    Upon further review and collaborating with the committee, most have agreed that the emphasis is not necessary at all.  The material is displayed, which sets it off from the text via margins and blank lines; making the emphasis just eye candy.

    You have quoted the UEB rule about multiple elements that are emphasized correctly.

    The Formats study guide will be amended.

    Cindi

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