Line graph with two y values at opposite ends of the graph

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  • #37687
    Michael Gunner
    Participant

    Hi Donald,

    I cannot seem to find guidance as to how to best represent the attached line graph. Both values are needed on the same graph just not sure as to whether or not following is print is better than have both y values on the left side of the graph.

    Thank you,

    Mike

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    #37724
    Donald Winiecki
    Participant

    Thanks for the question!

    Our experts want to note first that this is an example where we "follow print." Attached is a quick example of how you could handle this by putting the long horizontal graph across two facing pages, with the Y-coordinate scales arranged exactly as shown in print.

    We would like to note that we have attached a "new and improved" graphic <line-graph-sample_Across-facing-pages_MK-Rev2.docx>. The newly attached graphic still uses colors to indicate the actual plotted graph lines. You should use distinct tactile line types for each (more on that below).

    Other than that, the image reflects accurate placement of braille around the different parts of the graph.

    You probably also know the following, but we are including it to be complete for other readers. All of these are found in GSTG 6.6.2.2. GSTG is "Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics" and is found at the following URL on BANA's website http://www.brailleauthority.org/tg/index.html

    1. Grid lines should be the least distinct lines on the graph
    2. X and Y axis lines should be tactually distinct from and stronger than the grid lines
    3. Tick marks may be the same line strength as the X and Y axis lines, and should cross the axes by 1/4" (6mm) on each side
    4. The plotted lines should be the boldest and most distinct in the entire graphic.
    5. Plotted lines should be solid unless shown as broken lines in print. This is to retain any relationship between line type and the mathematical significance of the line type that was incorporated by the original designers of the print graphic.
    6. Each plotted line must be tactually distinct so it can be easily followed by readers. Variations could involve width or height of the lines. This is especially important when plotted lines cross as is shown in your original print example.

    We hope this answers your question! Please let us know if you have any follow-ups.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by Donald Winiecki. Reason: Include accounting for technical errors in the plotted lines and the right end of the X-coordinate scale. (See two bullets in the middle of the text part of this posting.)
    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by Donald Winiecki. Reason: Post a revised graphic fixing some misplacement of details
    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by Donald Winiecki. Reason: Post fixed version of the graphic. Edit text to clarify fixes
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