Braillekey

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Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • in reply to: Number Lines #30461
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Hi Cindy, thank you for reaching out to us and supplying a document for review. We would like to let you know that your question is currently pending review by the Tactile Graphics Committee. We will submit our answer as time permits. Thank you for your patience to this matter.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by Braillekey.
    in reply to: Bar Graphs in Tactile Graphics #30446
    Braillekey
    Participant

     

    Hi David, we would like to start off by saying that [G&S 2010] provides guidelines for use and there is not just one way, but there is always a better way to transform images into tactile graphics.

    After reviewing the 4 examples provided we noticed a lack of space between components of these graphics. Please consider the space between components, typically 1/8” clearance, when preparing graphics in the future. With this in mind, our top choice is example 1. Now, since this graphic is written across facing pages, you might want to repeat the vertical axis line from the first page onto the second, since tracking across the binding edge is difficult. Note, the “Year” label should be embedded in transcriber’s note indicators since it doesn’t appear in print. Additionally, the use of white space should be employed for dots that cross other textures within the graphic. This process should be used on all the examples that were provided.

    Example 2: Mention of the interchanged vertical “Percentage of total population” and horizontal “Year” axis lines will suffice for transcriber’s note explanation. Additionally, this graphic is too cluttered and lacks room for navigating the page for braille readers. We do not suggest using this method.

    Example 3: The graphic bars are too close together. This method seems too busy for use.

    Example 4: Mention of the interchanged vertical “Percentage of total population” and horizontal “Year” axis lines will suffice for transcriber’s note explanation. These graph bars also seem to lack enough space.

    Hope this helps!

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by Braillekey.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by betty.marshall.
    in reply to: Bar Graphs in Tactile Graphics #30445
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Hi James, thank you for writing in and providing examples for review. Your topic is currently under review by the TG Committee and a response will be sent shortly.

    in reply to: A zigzag line that appears ona vertical/horizontal axis line #30288
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Hi Elizabeth, the tactile graphics committee would like to reiterate the fact that zig zag patterns should not be added to a TG when they are non-existent in print. One should always strive to make the “material fit” using the G&S 6.6 Graph component guidelines as I mentioned earlier. Now in the event that these “breaks” do exist in print, follow print design. These can be spurred then thermoformed if using the collage method or drawn as lines when using graphics software. Regardless of the method used, you might want to input a transcriber’s note explaining what the interruption method is (lines, zigzags, etc.) and what these breaks achieve.

    Attached please find a Cartesian zig-zag interrupted y-axis, followed by a bar-graph break image and TG transformation.

    NOTE: THIS IMAGE WAS RETRIEVED FROM: https://peltiertech.com/broken-y-axis-in-excel-chart/

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    in reply to: A zigzag line that appears ona vertical/horizontal axis line #30282
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Hi Elizabeth, thanks for writing and supplying an example for viewing. First of all, since the image does not contain a zig-zag pattern, it should not be included in the braille edition. However, a transcriber’s note placed before the graphic can address your plans of editing the print content. With this in mind, your need of retaining the 18 lines of the Y-axis can be achieved by omitting every other line of this axis. Thus, only 10 lines can be used for reproducing the vertical axis. This leaves plenty of room for the x-axis lines and labels in their entirety. This guidance can be verified by referencing [G&S 6.6.1.3].

    Hope this helps.

     

    in reply to: A zigzag line that appears ona vertical/horizontal axis line #30277
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Can you please attach an example?

    in reply to: Animal Tactile Graphics #30109
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Hi, thank you for writing in with your question. Guidelines for this technique are covered in Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics, 2010. This can be retrieved at http://www.brailleauthority.org/tg/index.html.

    If you have deemed that a 2 dimension approach is appropriate, using the method you describe (right or left view of the animal) maintains the vertical and horizontal aspects of the print graphic. You might want to visit Sections 3.6-3.6.2, 11.2.2, 6.11.

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: volume with cubes #29980
    Braillekey
    Participant

    Hi Susan, thank you for your question.

    The use of the mat plan format for representing cubes shown in orthographic views is a good one. Now, regarding the wire frames that outline the cubes,  this should be disregarded. This change can be explained within a transcriber's note at the beginning of each volume if the occurrence is frequent.

    Hope this helps!

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)