Julie Sumwalt

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 121 total)
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  • in reply to: UEB and WEB or email addresses #31363
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Susan,

    So sorry for the delay. This forum is new and it slipped my attention. I'm moderating for now.

    You are correct; that seems to be a glitch in the Braille2000 programming. Dots 25 represent the contraction "cc" ONLY when it is between two letters so there is no need for the grade 1 symbol indicator in the instance of "https://" because the forward slash isn't a letter. The same for "c:\". If, however, you have "c:index" (I'm making something up; I've no idea if that would ever happen in the computer world.), then you would need the grade 1 symbol indicator because dots 25 are between two letters.

    Braille on,

    Julie

    in reply to: Page change indicators and passage indicators #31343
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    It depends on what comes after. Can you provide the print and braille you're talking about?

    Julie

    in reply to: Transcriber-Defined Typeforms for Small Capitals #31209
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi,

    The transcriber-defined typeform word indicator must use a terminator if the effect stops within a symbols-sequence, following the rules of typeform indicators. The rules of capitalization do not apply to typeform indicators. And, P.S., where capitalization IS shown, the rules of capitalization apply, not the rules of typeform indicators.

    Braille on,

    Julie

    in reply to: brailling 1st with the st raised #31181
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi,

    Please contact me directly with this question. julie.sumwalt@wcbvi.k12.wi.us

    Regards,

    Julie

    in reply to: Copyright Symbols and ISBN #31152
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

     

    Hi,

    This has to do with formatting rather than code, but I will answer your questions here.

    1. A print example would be helpful. All I can say is that if you see the copyright symbol, braille it where it is. If you see the word “copyright”, that’s what you braille. If you see both, braille both.
    2. No, it means braille what you see. Don’t add anything. If a text is copyrighted, it will say so with the symbol, the word, or both. If it is not copyrighted, it won’t have any of those things and adding them will be giving misinformation.
    3. Braille what you see, don’t add what you don’t. What has been stated or not stated is the legal information provided by the publisher. We transcribers don’t mess with that.
    4. The ISBN acronym does not need to be on the same line as the number. There is no reason to divide “Transcription of ISBN:”.

    Braille on,

    Julie

     

    in reply to: Flowchart Numbering #31139
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Melissa,

    Thanks for your patience. You are on the right track. I've attached the flowchart with the remaining boxes numbered. When you are done with box 7, go back up to box 3, not box 2, because box 2 is done.

    I'm not sure what DMC stands for.

    I like your use of non-UEB code switch indicators. A category heading on the SS page seems a good choice in this case.

    Good job! Flowcharts are challenging.

    Braille on,

    Julie

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    in reply to: Flowchart Numbering #31102
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Stand by ... I'm consulting.

    Julie

    in reply to: Degree Sign and Prime Sign #30988
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hello Cindy and Clay,

    In the example you have shown, the prime and double prime signs are shown. They are real prime signs because they are slanted. So that is what you should braille--that is, the first simbraille example that you included in your question.

    If, however, what you have shown me is a result of your computer because you retyped the passage and the actual text in front of you shows those symbols as straight up and down, then an apostrophe and a nondirectional quotation were used in the text. The rule says that these "can" be brailled as exactly that--your simbraille example #2. I don't take this to mean that we must, but that we can. That said, UEB tends to follow print very closely, so if I can easily tell that the marks are straight up and down, that is what I do.

    Keep in mind that dots 2356 will be read as the contraction for "were" if it's standing alone, so you will need a grade 1 indicator for those situations. The double prime sign can't be mistaken for anything else, so that symbol does not need a grade 1 indicator.

    I should also state that if this is being transcribed in Nemeth within UEB, then Nemeth rules and symbols apply.

    Braille on,

    Julie

    in reply to: German word in English Text #30641
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Lealisa,

    Thanks for waiting while I researched this interesting question. First of all, the β isn't a modified letter, it's a non-Latin letter in the German alphabet. World Braille Usage shows dots 2346, but then the other foreign language symbols for the umlauted letters would also have to be used instead of UEB modifiers, and would necessitate the use of non-UEB code switch indicators ... way too complicated for a novel. There is no provision yet in the UEB code for that letter. The International Council of English Braille is planning to establish a symbol in the future. In the meantime, the easiest solution is to substitute "ss" for the β and explain this in a transcriber's note.

    Braille on,

    Julie

     

    in reply to: UEB arrow #30328
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Betty,

    Confirmed: Use the equilibrium arrow shown in GTM 16. I've attached a BRF file and (hopefully) simbraille below.

    ;;;,H9"6"6,H,C,O5#C9"- ^_7 ,H5#2,C,O5#C

    ^_7 ,H5#B,O"6,C,O5#B;'

    Braille on,

    Julie

     

     

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    in reply to: UEB arrow #30325
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Betty,

    I'm looking into this. GTM 16 Chemistry shows a different construct for an equilibrium arrow, which looks like what you have. I'll get back to you soon.

    Regards,

    Julie

    in reply to: a(n) — nonuse of G1 indicator #30247
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Katrina,

    I understand the snafu with quotation marks and dot 5. 🙂

    Your conclusion and reasoning are solid. There is no need for grade 1 indicators in this symbols-sequence.

    Braille on,

    Julie

    in reply to: UEB contractions #30146
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi Lynnette,

    The 10.9.2 rule is actually two-fold, that the longer word with “good” is either in the shortforms list or begins a word and is not followed by a vowel or y. ICEB decided that “goody” was a worthy addition to the list. The list takes precedence over the vowel rule. Therefore, it’s acceptable to use the shortform. There are other words that parallel this: goodie, goodun, goodyear, goodest.

    According to the rules for list construction at the end of Appendix 1, words containing shortforms may be added to the list if the longer word retains an original meaning of the base shortform word. As for "must," it can refer to a musty state. "Musty", "mustier", and, believe it or not, "mustard", all have ties to this definition. (Mustard was originally made with must. Who knew?) "Mustang", "muster", and "mustache" have no connection to any definition of "must".

    By the way, those rules for list construction are meant to be informative, not instructive. They are the rules that ICEB followed when constructing the list. They are not rules for transcribers to independently add words when they come across a word they think should be there.

    Braille on,

    Julie

    in reply to: Italicized Passage #30132
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi,

    I agree that it would be best to italicize Little Dancer separately.

    Braille on,

    Julie

    in reply to: Use symbol or word italic indicator for the word I #30104
    Julie Sumwalt
    Participant

    Hi,

    Use the italic symbol indicator. UEB 9.2.1 shows an example of an italicized "i" as a letter, and 9.2.2 shows an example of an underlined "I" as a word. Both use symbol indicators. Context is not a factor, making it easier to use translation software, the reason for treating "I" this way.

    Braille on,

    Julie

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 121 total)