kdejute

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  • in reply to: Number Line Question #40726
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Great question. Thank you, Lucas.

    Personally, I would put a grade 1 symbol indicator between the minus symbol and the letter. But I have cross-posted this question in NBA's tactile graphics forum so we can get further input. In that forum, the question is titled Number Line Question, negative lowercase letter below number line.

    –Kyle

    in reply to: spatial addition with omission boxes #40586
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Thank you for your question, Susan!

    We think it is alright to use the visible space symbol without any grade 1 indicators as long as it does not follow a letter.

    If we use the one-cell visible space symbol instead of the box that print shows to indicate an omission, we should explain that change in a transcriber's note. For example, "The visible space symbol .=+ is used in braille where print has a box."

    A possible transcription of item 1 from the print you shared is attached (as a picture and as a BRF).

    What do you think? Does this help?

    –Kyle

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    in reply to: spatial addition with omission boxes #40580
    kdejute
    Moderator

    We (NBA's UEB Technical Material Committee) are debating and will get back with you today or tomorrow. –Kyle

    in reply to: Modifiers directly above or below #40571
    kdejute
    Moderator

    You found it!

    GTM 3.1.3 says:

    Signs of comparison are unspaced when they appear in an expression
    which is not on the base line.

    We also talked about this in the webinar "Spacing Exceptions," which is in the NBA archive of short webinars.

    Braille on!
    –Kyle

    in reply to: Format help #40336
    kdejute
    Moderator

    "With a fair few tactile graphics" is likely the answer. For grades K-3, we really are encouraged to use tactile graphics instead of shape symbols (by both Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics and Guidelines for the Transcription of Early Educational Materials).

    Your example is no exception. We have to expect that the teacher will refer to the arrows, boxes, and circles. And it is reasonable to expect that the second-grade student will not be fluent in UEB arrow symbols, shape symbols, or symbols for physical enclosure (e.g., a circle with a minus inside it).

    Perhaps something roughly like the transcription in the attached picture will work for you. Make sure your graphics (unlike the rough draft in the attached picture) follow Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics best practices (i.e., correct arrowhead shape as well as texture of and spacing around lines).

    Braille on!
    –Kyle

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    in reply to: numeric passage indicator #40321
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Exactly. We cannot use contractions within a numeric passage, because numeric mode sets grade 1 mode.

    Regarding the carried numbers' need for numeric indicators, again: exactly. If it is not in a numeric passage, we must use a numeric indicator for a carried number so it cannot be misread as a letter or series of letters.

    So glad we can help!

    in reply to: Partial sum diagram #40305
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Susan,

    You should probably confirm with your customer (or teacher or student), but, yes, I think you could use braille column headings coupled with careful alignment to capture the intent of the partial sum boxes/tables/diagrams that are shown in the print examples you shared.

    For what it is worth, attached is a .brf and a picture of how we might transcribe these partial sum examples.

    –Kyle

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    kdejute
    Moderator

    Well said!

    In short, no. At least, not according to the yet-to-be-published Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics, 2022.

    I would not include the numeric passage indicator or numeric passage terminator for a number line. Remember, a note would need to be included on the Transcriber’s Note page alerting the reader of the omission.

    –Kyle

    kdejute
    Moderator

    You're going to love this. ... We are not totally certain! However ...

    The majority of the members of NBA's committee on UEB for Technical Materials would place the numeric passage indicator and numeric terminator around a spatial arrangement in cell 1.

    But I cannot point to a particular rule or guideline to support that.

    Our reasoning could be explained as follows. When you start getting into displayed material, the indentions for runovers can get up to cell 9 and further. In the interest of simplifying and staying consistent, we recommend consistently putting the indicators for a numeric passage in cell 1. [Though we are very tempted to follow Braille Formats and place the indicators for a numeric passage based on those principles.]

    Last, but not least, remember the final paragraph of GTM 4.1, which says,

    The line above and below spatial calculations should either be blank, or should only contain the numeric passage indicator or terminator.

    Braille on!
    –Kyle

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Thank you for sharing your question, Susan!

    I need to consult with other committee members to give you a full answer.

    But I can start with:

    BANA's "Provisional Guidance on Transcribing Mathematics in UEB" (Approved May 2019) says (in part),

    For displayed mathematical expressions, use blank lines preceding and following; and indent 2 cells from the runover position of the material to which they apply. –second paragraph under 3. General format

    That means the spatial addition problem in your example should have its left margin at  cell 5.

    Now I'm going to ask others about placement of the numeric passage indicator and terminator.

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Number lines #40252
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Susan,

    I'm glad we took the opportunity to communicate directly and look more closely at some of the number lines you have in front of you.

    A very short summary of our discussion might be: Keep any number line that gives unique information, but do not reproduce multiple blank number lines that are exactly the same for a non-consumable book.

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Number lines #40240
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Susan,

    I hear you! Zero to fifteen is a wide number line!

    In short, runovers of number lines begin in cell 3 (with the initial line of the number line starting in cell 1), with a tick mark beginning the runover line; no continuation indicator should be used.

    You probably already know, but please let me state: line graphics (NOT braille dots) should be used for all number lines in a 2nd grade transcription.

    Those guidelines are from the BANA 2022 Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics, which have been approved by the BANA Board and are now being carefully prepared for general distribution.

    Please let us know if you need anything more or different!

    –Kyle

    in reply to: single-word switch indicator clarification #40223
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Shelley,

    A possibly useful way of reading the "may" you asked about in the Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts is that it means we can either 1) use the single-word switch indicator or 2) close Nemeth Code before the word and then open Nemeth Code again after the word. Either way, the word is transcribed in UEB.

    –Kyle

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Melissa,

    Certainly you are not the only person who has this question. I think I can offer some insight.

    Unlike the other symbols on a Special Symbols page, the Nemeth Code terminator and the single-word switch indicator are Nemeth Code symbols. Everything else is a UEB symbol. (Okay, if the Special Symbols page includes a category of “Nemeth Horizontal Number Line Symbols” then not eeeverything else on that Special Symbols page is a UEB symbol, but you know what I mean.)

    Although, it seems obvious that the "Nemeth Code terminator" is a Nemeth Code symbol, it might not be so obvious when you consider that the "opening Nemeth Code indicator" is a UEB symbol. So, on the Special Symbols page, we explicitly label the Nemeth Code terminator and the single-word switch indicator with the parenthetical "(Nemeth Code symbol)".

    I hope that helps in some way!
    –Kyle

    P.S. The opening Nemeth Code indicator is a UEB symbol; it happens when UEB is the code in effect.

    in reply to: math with a lot of words #39937
    kdejute
    Moderator

    Shelley,

    For better and worse, you are correct that a full expression should be within Nemeth Code switch indicators, including expressions that are inconveniently made up of a lot of words.

    So, yes, something like:

    P(likes avocados ∩ doesn't like Avocados)

    should all be within Nemeth Code, which means no contractions and unspaced symbols of operation.

    Braille on!
    –Kyle

    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by kdejute. Reason: I meant UNspaced symbols of OPERATION not comparison 😬
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 482 total)