kdejute

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  • in reply to: UEB Single Word Switch Use #34370

    kdejute
    Moderator

    That is a correct transcription. I would do it the same way.

    So, the answer to the question of “Can I use a single-word switch indicator for a word immediately following an opening grouping sign?” is “Yes.” And, if you do use a single-word switch indicator for a word immediately following an opening grouping sign then the closing grouping sign should be preceded by Nemeth Code material and so also be in Nemeth Code (as it is in your attachment).

    Neat question. Thank you for sharing!

    –Kyle

    in reply to: closing Nemeth between graphic and exercises #34362

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Shelley,

    Thank you for passing along this question, and thank you for outlining it before referring to the attachment.

    A reader-friendly place to put the Nemeth Code terminator after a tactile graphic is following a blank line in cell one on a line by itself. This is in line with section 9.b under Additional Guidelines in the Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts (Approved April 2018) and also section 5.1.2 of the Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics, 2010.

    (As always, when an updated Tactile Graphic Guidelines that includes guidelines for transcriptions using Nemeth Code within UEB contexts is published by BANA, whatever it says overrides anything in these Ask an Expert forums.)

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Systems of equations #34347

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Thank you for the question, Tung.

    In response:

    1. Print clearly has the variables aligned, so you do need to align the variables x and y.
    2. You do not need a numeric indicator before the number 8 on the second line. The space inserted before it for purposes of aligning variables is not considered when deciding whether or not to use a numeric indicator.
    3. Your code switch indicators are placed quite correctly. (The opening code switch indicator is placed on a line with text preceding spatial material with a blank line following it, and the terminator is placed following the blank line after spatial material in cell 1 on a line by itself.)

    Cheers!

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Keying a table Nemeth/UEB #34312

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Response coming soon …

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  kdejute. Reason: incomplete response removed

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Yes, this is a difficult exercise for the braille user to get satisfaction from. Even a tactile graphic of the line drawing of Snoopy the cartoon dog holding up a piece of paper with A+ written on it would probably be mostly meaningless.

    I agree with Cindi that presenting each quadrant on a separate braille page would allow the student to complete the activity and thus prove their understanding of coordinate points on the plane. [The only alternative to that I can think of is using a poster-board-sized piece of paper for the whole coordinate plane, which would be rather spectacular and really bulky/involved.]

    Thank you for sharing the challenge and your thoughts!

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Spatial Problems #34227

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Thank you for the question.

    You’re right that the placement in print of the sentence-ending period, following an expression that must be transcribed as spatial material, is inconvenient (to say the least).

    I cannot point to a section in which either the Nemeth Code or the Guidance addresses sentence-ending punctuation and spatially arranged division. As you obviously know, sentence-ending punctuation that’s followed by non-technical material belongs after the Nemeth Code terminator. So, I suspect that the most reader-friendly placement of the period you ask about would be immediately following the Nemeth Code terminator, even if that results in a braille line that contains nothing but a Nemeth Code terminator and a period.

    Unrelated to punctuation: What if the word “Remainder” were uncontracted and treated as a label that’s part of the synthetic division arrangement?

    I hope that is helpful. Thank you again for the question.

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Letters And Parentheses #34036

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Celia,

    Thank you for the question.

    The letter p in the situation you describe should not be preceded by an English Letter Indicator.

    As Nemeth Code section 27.g says, ‘The English-letter indicator must not be used with any letter or combination of letters which are neither “single letters” nor “short-form combinations” in situations not specifically covered (see §§26, 27, 28, and 51).’

    –Kyle

    P.S. The p you describe is not a “single letter” according to Nemeth Code section 25.a.vi.

    in reply to: Double Struck Capital R #33939

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Shawn,

    I would strongly recommend using the Nemeth Code script typeform for double-struck Rs, with a TN to explain the representation of print.

    Please see page 7-11 (in Lesson 7) of the Provisional Nemeth Instruction Manual for further discussion of this approach to retaining print distinction.

    Thank you for the question!

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Switch indicators at page turns #33887

    kdejute
    Moderator
    Thank you for your question and for your patience as we discussed the following response.
    First, #11 under the heading Additional Guidelines in the Guidance for Transcription Using Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts says, “The opening Nemeth Code indicator and the Nemeth Code terminator should be placed on the same page with part of the expression to which they apply.” Please take this to mean that the opening Nemeth Code indicator should not be the last thing on a print page. (Neither should it be the last thing on a braille page, but that is not what we’re addressing here.)
    Second, please note that both sections quoted in your question deal with braille page breaks, while the actual question and illuminating example deal with a print page break within a braille page.
    Last, but not least, the section references and related quotations in your question are from the Provisional Instruction Manual on Nemeth Code, which is not a rule book. The Instruction Manual is based on: the Nemeth Code, its updates, and the Guidance mentioned above.
    Thank you again for your thoughtful question. It will help to make the Guidance for Transcription Using Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts more complete and precise.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 4 weeks ago by  kdejute. Reason: Inaccurate response, awaiting correction
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  kdejute. Reason: Response updated following committee discussion
    in reply to: answer blanks in UEB/Nemeth #33843

    kdejute
    Moderator

    When I wrote that last paragraph, I was thinking of a recent question about Nemeth or UEB squares: https://www.nationalbraille.org/topic/nemeth-or-ueb-squares/

    If that doesn’t clarify my final paragraph to you, please do say.

    –Kyle

    in reply to: answer blanks in UEB/Nemeth #33842

    kdejute
    Moderator

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  kdejute. Reason: remove duplicate post
    in reply to: enlarged ( ) for spatial fractions #33834

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Shelley,

    Thank you for the questions.

    Grouping symbols around fractions that are transcribed spatially are not enlarged [because they do not enclose multiple separate rows of information]; they are transcribed using simple one-cell grouping symbols on the braille line with the fraction indicators and fraction line.

    See the fraction transcribed spatially in the denominator of the second example on page 79 of the Nemeth Code [section 68’s example (3)].

    In response to your second question, section 60 of the Nemeth Code says in part, “Items which are individually canceled in ink print must be represented as individually canceled in the transcription.” Unfortunately, there is not a way to transcribe your print’s one long strike that cancels both one fraction’s denominator and a separate fraction’s numerator. So, yes, simply cancel each appropriate numerator or denominator on its own.

    Braille on!

    –Kyle

     

    in reply to: answer blanks in UEB/Nemeth #33833

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Trumbull,

    This can be tricky, and, like you, I cannot point to a rule that specifically addresses blanks in a Nemeth-within-UEB transcription.

    I *can,* however, affirm that it is inappropriate for the transcriber to give more information than the print does about what an answer should/will be like.

    What I’m trying to say is, transcribe a low-line/omission dash/underscore according to where it appears in print and NOT what will/should replace it.

    So, in your (very illustrative!) examples:

    The low line that is part of a math expression (involving the “is congruent to” symbol) should be in Nemeth Code.

    The low lines following the words “corresponds to” should be in UEB.

    Really, I would put the low line in the sentence “So <fraction> is ____.” in UEB … following the reasoning that the braille reader is getting the same information as the print reader from the instructions “The answer will be in decimal form.” and to transcribe the low line in Nemeth Code would be overkill.

    Of course, this doesn’t solve all of our dilemmas, but I hope it shrinks some of them.

    … Please let me add that I would transcribe consistently in Nemeth Code a <b>shape</b> that stands for something missing within a math expression and is then repeated and asked about outside of a math expression.

    –Kyle

     

    in reply to: Nemeth or UEB Squares #33813

    kdejute
    Moderator

    In item #5, where print uses squares to indicate a missing something in a mathematical expression, we’ll use the Nemeth square shape, as you say. With the goal of giving the reader consistent symbols, we’ll also use the Nemeth square for the other square, after “value of”.

    The shapes that precede each answer choice are not part of the meaning of the text. I would omit them in braille or use a transcriber-defined shape for these squares. (The “transcriber-defined shape” is explained in the Rules of UEB, and the Guidance for Nemeth within UEB says it can be used both in UEB and between Nemeth Code switch indicators.) Whether you omit the squares before answer choices or transcribe them using a transcriber-defined shape, you’ll be giving the braille reader the same thing at the beginning of every answer choice.

    Thank you for the questions! Please do let us know if you have more.

    –Kyle

    in reply to: Pascal's Triangle #33795

    kdejute
    Moderator

    Here is an image file of the above BRF.

    Attachments:
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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 318 total)