bach2brl

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  • in reply to: Order of Signs: note, slur, rest, note? #29328

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Hi Christina,

    My apologies for not responding sooner! You were correct in your answer. I too, love the new codebook! It is so much easier to access and a print version will be available soon from AHP.

     

    in reply to: Instruction books #28310

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Hello, Susan

    My apologies for the delayed response! The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped has an extensive library of music braille scores, instruction books, textbooks and orchestral scores. If you go to http://www.loc.gov/nls you will see a link to the music department on the right hand side. Once there, you can search for the exact book that you’re looking for. (I did a quick search and found the Essential Elements instruction books for percussion and strings, but not B-flat clarinet.) However, it may be wise to call the office as well since it may be currently in production as well. Hope this helps!

    in reply to: code changes #26445

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Yes, there is a newly revised and updated music code that BANA recently approved. The changes are not extensive but it is certainly encouraged that you familiarize yourself with the changes that were made. There is a publication currently available in the NBA online store entitled “Music and UEB” that covers the changes made specifically to that area of the code. The Fall 2016 Professional Development Conference in St. Louis will have a workshop dedicated solely to the 40+ updates to the Music Code, as well as a workshop on integrating UEB in Music Textbooks.

    in reply to: Software #22812

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Our apologies for the late response to your question. I would recommend that you contact Dancing Dots, a company that has a software program called GOODFEEL. This music braille translation program is quite adept at transcribing basic music notation but I can not speak to whether or not it will correctly annotate drum music or chord symbols. William McCann, the owner of the company is also the engineer who wrote the software program so he is very knowledgeable and could answer your question more specifically. go to dancing dots.com for more information.

    in reply to: pagination #22647

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Thank you!

    in reply to: Toccata program #22556

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Susan,

    Thank you for your question. My apologies for not being able to reply sooner. Most music braillist do not use a translation program, opting instead for the six-key input method. In my experience, the optical reading software that accompanies the translation software package is inferior to what the human eye can detect. In the few instances that I have tried Toccata, I found that the six-key input method was a far more efficient use of my time than to go back into the braille and edit what the computer “thought” it saw on the page. It was simply faster for me to braille the piece than to scan it, translate it and then edit it.

    I hope this answers your question. Thank you for your post!
    edited by bach2brl on 11/15/2014

    in reply to: How to Read Braille Music #22236

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Susan, Our apologies for not responding to your email sooner. I actually have an extra copy that you are welcome to have. If you send your full name and address to heidi@bach2braille.com I can get it out in the mail between the holidays.

    in reply to: Lyrics only PLEASE HELP #22289

    bach2brl
    Participant

    Since this is a rather difficult language to learn and pronounce correctly, I would advise that you use a running parallel of two lines for the uncontracted lyrics. The top line would be the original Cherokee language, uncontracted and directly beneath it on the second line, the uncontracted words showing the correct pronunciation of the Cherokee dialect. The corresponding music would then be indented to cell 3 directly below the lyrics. Page 181 of the Music Braille Code, Example 22.17-1 shows an example of french lyrics done in a similar manner. Great question!

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