Kathleen

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  • in reply to: Follow up for negative numbers post #42515
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Yeah, that was what I thought it meant, as well. (I'm glad to know my musical instincts are still sharp!)

    It's actually not logical according to the notation, as the player would normally hold onto the note through the tied 8th notes, but here the composer wants the release on the beat, so in essence, removing the tied note. (I've never encountered this in instrumental music, but it is a frequent occurrence in vocal music.)

    This will require a transcriber's note, no matter what you choose to do. I think I might enclose the tied notes below the numbers in parentheses. That way the player knows it's there in print, but the indication is to cut off on that note rather than hold it. If you do this and explain what print looks like, you can then omit the number from the music line.

    Let me know what you think!

     

    in reply to: Negative numbers above notes #42508
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Interesting - I have not seen this in Baritone music either. (I've seen it in string music but the baritone can't shift hand position so it certainly doesn't mean that!!)

    My best guess is that it means to cut off on beat 4 and beat 3, respectively, but that's just my initial interpretation based on the music. I wouldn't dream of putting that in as the way it should be interpreted. I think in this case you can use your judgement as to how you want to indicate it. Either as a footnote with a TN explaining at each instance or as a word sign expression in parentheses following the note. If you use parentheses, you may want to add a TN before the music saying that you've done that. Otherwise the reader will have no idea that it comes above the notes and is not enclosed in parentheses in print.

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Strophic Songs with Slight Variation in Refrain #42485
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Good morning!

    Your braille is very close! Instead of the lower cell numbers for the verses, use upper cell numbers enclosed in UEB parentheses. Check out example 35.7.3-1 in the Code.

    (And you need a blank cell after the dot 3 measure continuation number! The dot 3 only takes the place of the blank cell in bar over bar keyboard format.)

    Thanks!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Bar-Over-Bar with Chords and Runovers #42484
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Good morning!

    I don't see anything in the Code that prohibits a run-over in the right hand when you have chord symbols with piano music. Of course, you wouldn't be able to use a run-over in the left hand, so I would try and keep it to a minimum in the right hand as well.

    The page turn indicator would go on a line by itself indented two cells after the hand signs if it doesn't fit in both lines aligned. So your placement is correct in your examples! (Remember that you do not need the actual page number unless there are two or more print page turns on a single braille page.)

    Kathleen

    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Great! Please let me know if you have more questions! Happy to help!

    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    Couple of things I noticed -  in vocal music, measure number repeats are not used. So at the lyrics "If I'd been out till..." you can't use the lower-cell 5-6. You must braille it out. (see Music Braille Code 35.8)

    I usually put CODA fully caps, at the start of the word line, not enclosed in word-sign indicators (to match what we do with REFRAIN and CHORUS etc.)

    The verse numbers of just text at the end should be enclosed in literary parentheses, not word-sign indicators.

    Ok - now to your actual question! If I start to struggle figuring out the repeat structure and which lyrics go where, I will braille it out completely, rather than have several lines of two verses together - and in this case the song has three verses, so that's not really a possibility! I tend to use more measure numbers than is "required" by the Code. Especially if there are Brailled-out repeats - having more frequent measure numbers can help the reader figure out where they are. And if they also have the piano score, which has numbers for every parallel, there will be more points of connection if the vocal score has measure numbers as well.  (FYI - in choral music and ensemble music I put measure numbers on every line! It helps a great deal when a braille-reading musician is collaborating with print-reading musicians who can easily say, let's start at measure 14!)

    So basically, once these pop songs start adding more than one verse with more than one Volta, I braille everything out. You'll find it doesn't require that much more space and will reduce complications a bunch.

    All the best!

    Kathleen

     

    in reply to: Integration: strophic songs w/ complex arrangements. #42367
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there,

    I agree that in a piano-dominant format, showing the different syllable elision for a 2nd or 3rd verse seems unnecessarily complicated. If you are only doing the vocal part, perhaps it's worth it to show the differences in the verses, though.

    I think your idea of adding "VERSE" and "VERSE ENDS" looks helpful. These pop songs with complicated repeat patterns are tricky enough as it is! I think readers would be thankful for a little extra help navigating.

    (Just noticed that in the pickup measure, you have a half rest instead of a quarter rest!)

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Chords and Lead Sheets #42366
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    <p style="font-weight: 400;">Hi there! Thanks for the pdfs!</p>
    <p style="font-weight: 400;">Reminder - in bar-over-bar format, a backward-numeral repeat may only be used if the original and the repeat are in the same parallel. (See Music Braille Code 19.7) So you can’t use the 4/3 repeat at measure 5. You can, however, use a measure number repeat – you could use the lower number 1-3 to show that those three measure repeat. If you do that, definitely braille out the right hand of measure 3. It’s too complicated to send the reader back to a repeat that has a different repeat in it!</p>
    <p style="font-weight: 400;">The use of the bar line between 19 and 20 is appropriate, since there is a coinciding blank space in all 3 lines of the parallel in the middle of the measure. And yes, also use the hyphens here, too. Not overkill at all – it’s actually helpful, I believe. Same at measure 55. The way you’ve transcribed this is correct.</p>
    <p style="font-weight: 400;">Just a couple of things that I spotted while looking over this for your specific question - You don’t need to use the page number within the music line after measure 67. It’s the only page turn over on the braille page, so the number isn’t necessary.</p>
    <p style="font-weight: 400;">Be sure your dot 3 separators after your hand signs are indeed dot 3s and not dot 6s! (m. 67 popped out)</p>
    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Chords and Lead Sheets #42336
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    Can you try again?

    - the pdf is too large for this platform.

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Chords and Lead Sheets #42325
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    Without seeing the print music, I can't give a complete answer. But just reading the braille, I don't know why you've divided measure 50. Usually only the left hand would be divided to align with the chord symbols, and it doesn't appear to need a division here.

    If you choose to use the bar lines, you don't technically need the dot 5 hyphen as well.

    If you can send me an image of the print measures, I can more accurately answer this!

    Thanks!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Strophic songs #42067
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Sorry Annie!

    I was not alerted that there was a follow-up message!

    I think the measure numbers would suffice for the beginning of the verse. I don't think a TN is necessary.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Triplet Doubling with Appoggiaturas #42066
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    This is a tricky one, as it's not specifically covered in the Code.

    However tempting it may be, I don't think I would double the triplets in this case, even though the appoggiaturas are outside the rhythmic content of the measure. Since we put the triplet indicator after the appoggiatura I would argue that it would be more confusing than helpful to have it doubled and then interrupted by the grace notes.

    Another argument for not doubling the triplet is that we cannot double intervals or nuances if the appoggiaturas are not affected in the same manner. I say the same goes for the triplet doubling.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Pagination #41714
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Yes, I use formats literary pagination for method books like this. But music pagination can work as well.

    It is not unheard of to use literary pagination for preliminary pages, if there is a great deal of prelim material. But I usually use the same style for the whole book. It gets tricky if there is a lot of text interspersed with full musical works (anthologies and similar volumes) but method books are usually good with just one style.

    Clear as mud, right?

     

    in reply to: Handbook for Braille Music Transcribers #40927
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Julie,

    Many of the concepts in it are indeed still valid. It expands upon the Braille Code with additional examples that did not get covered in the Code. Granted, it is in EBAE and adheres to the 1997 code and not the 2015, so there are some things that are outdated. But I still use it. If you chose to use it, just be sure to double check the 2015 code to see if there are any contradictions.

    I have it on my list to update the Handbook. (In all of my free time...)

    Kathleen

     

    in reply to: underlined letter in lyrics #40907
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Lindy,

    So sorry to have taken months - I was never notified about this question!

    You are correct, though! The underline shows that the syllables are elided. We enclose the syllables in quotation marks. Then we add dots 12 after the note on which you sing those two syllables.

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 148 total)