Kathleen

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  • in reply to: Counting rhythm #38974
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna,

    Here's how I usually handle these: I include a TN to the effect of "Measures are often spaced irregularly to accommodate the counting below the notes. Special bar lines (dots 123) separate measures where spacing is irregular. The word "and" replaces the plus sign."

    And then I braille the numbers aligned below the notes, like we would for chord symbols or Roman numerals. Be sure there are blank cells aligned vertically between measures in both the music and the counting lines. Sometimes there will be extra blank cells in one or the other part.

    Some people like to use the numeric passage indicator and terminator on the counting lines, but I tend to just braille the numbers as they come, especially where there are "and's" involved.

    Attached is a pdf and a brf of the way I would do the examples you attached.

    (This is certainly not the only right way to approach it - it's just the way I tend to do it and it seems to work ok. You'll notice that I omitted the parentheses around the plus signs - I'd include a TN to that effect if I chose to take them out. If you feel like the parentheses are crucial - which they may well be - I'd probably use the special literary "dropped g" parentheses to save space.)

    Hope this helps!

    Kathleen

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    in reply to: Slurs in Vocal Music #38947
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    Great question - I would not use the bracket slur for the appogiatura slurs. They aren't really showing phrasing so it wouldn't be quite appropriate. I think the best option would be to use the facsimile slur, dots 56, 14, to show these. (I'd add this symbol to your SS list and perhaps even add a TN about their usage, since it is a little unusual.)

    As far as the division of the phrases, that's a matter of transcriber-choice, using your artistic and musical judgement. Remember that the singer will likely memorize the music and we want to lay out the parallels in as clear a way as possible. Dividing the melisma at logical and musical points is always a good idea rather than trying to fit the entire thing into a single parallel that may end up containing 2 or 3 run-over lines. (One run-over line is fine - but any longer than that makes it hard to memorize.)

    My suggestion is to sing or play through it and find good breaking points - places where a breath will be taken, for instance, or where there's a cadential feel to the phrase. The Music Code section 35.3 discusses how to show continued vowel sounds on new parallels, so be sure to reread that section as you work through the transcription.

     

    Hope this helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Alphabetically Organized Table of Contents #38929
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Lucas,

    I've conferred with some other folks and we agree that it is acceptable to break the rules for this kind of Table of Contents.

    On your Transcriber's Notes page, include a statement that you are changing the format of the ToC. Instead of doing alphabetical, as in print, I would follow the order in which they fall in each volume. Then only include what appears in each subsequent volume in that volume's particular ToC.

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Transcription Question #38645
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Lucas,

    I've always used in-accords for ornaments like this. It does seem a bit cumbersome when every measure has ornament options, but short of rewriting the whole aria a second time with the ornaments, this is the best way to present it. Besides, the singer may want to use some of the ornament options but not all. Rewriting the whole thing would make it more difficult to pick and choose their favorites.

    I also think it's fairly concise and helpful to the singer - they can skip over the in-accords when they want to or refer to the optional melodic lines when they want to do that.

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Foreign Language Lyrics #38608
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Lucas,

    I don't think code switch indicators are necessary. Just use the UEB acute accent with the affected words. It can't be mistaken for anything else in German, so there should be no confusion. Just remember to include it in your Special Symbols list!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Music Theory Exam Question #38439
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert,

    You are correct on both counts. The usual right hand piano sign, by definition, indicates that intervals are to be read downward, so even if you include the TN at the front of the volume, it's wise to use the special right hand sign for situations where intervals must be read upward.

    Your alignment factor will become the first musical signs in the measure (or the word sign indicators if they appear in both hands - I can't recall how the example you are describing looks at the moment). There may be blank spaces that look awkward after the LH sign, but that can't be avoided.

    All the best,

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Final Music Theory Exam Questions #38426
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    You wouldn't need to use Grade 1 indicators in literary context if you are in uncontracted braille - unless you are giving the name of a minor chord in music notation.  For example: a minor 6 chord in first inversion would be:

    ;VI#6

    The lower case indicator is part of the music code symbol for the lower case roman numeral.

    Yes - use the UEB sharp, flat, natural signs in literary context. If you are in music context, use the music symbol.

    I think your transcription of question 13 looks fine. But I would use the special right hand sign that indicates intervals are to be read upward:

    .>>

    And put a blank line between parallels.

    Hope that helps!

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Kathleen.
    in reply to: Follow-up to Music Theory Exam Questions #38419
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    (The simbraille in my response did not retain the indention pattern for question 8. Indent as would be appropriate!)

    And I see the simbraille didn't take for my response to question 9. Sorry!

     

    in reply to: Follow-up to Music Theory Exam Questions #38418
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    I would format the title and prelim pages like a textbook. Include special symbols and transcriber's notes as appropriate.

    Question 5 looks fine in your transcription.

    Question 8 I would do as a list. Put the whole note in music braille, terminate music braille code and give the interval direction after.

    #H4 ,COMPLETE EACH 444
    ,'<"& ;2,P#E UP
    ,'.Y ;2M#G D[N
    ,'"( ;2D#D UP

    Question 9 - use music code to indicate the chord inversions

    ;G M9OR ,'#46
    ;,E ,MAJOR ,'#36

    Question 10 - Transcribe the chords as they appear, reading intervals upward. The answers won't be given away.

    Question 12 - as above, I'd do these as a list, not as measures across the page.

    ,'_&+90 ;2;C% DIMINISHED ,'#56

     

    I don't see in the exam where you have to actually braille figured bass. But refer to section 30 in the MBC2015 to revisit how you do the figured bass. (In analysis situations like this, use the vertical format instead of the horizontal format.)

    in reply to: Whole-measure rests spacing #38412
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna,

    I don't see why we shouldn't braille the two rests together as we usually do. The only time I would separate them would be if there was a fermata above the second one or a tempo change with the second measure.

    I think the volta, 2 whole rests, repeat sign would be clear.

    If I'm not understanding the question clearly enough or there is something else in the print that you feel makes it unclear, feel free to send me a picture of the score.

     

    Thanks!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Music Theory Exam questions #38390
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert,

    Let's see if I can help -

    Question 1 - key signatures. The braille reader should just be required to indicate the signatures as they read them in braille.

    Question 5 - adding accidentals. You could braille each whole note with a blank cell in between them, giving space to mark where a flat or sharp would go. I don't think adding lines is necessary.

    Boxes and circles - I would make them distinct, for sure. For boxes I usually use music brackets around the enclosed notes in all parts. Circles would be fine with music parentheses. Use word sign expressions with the letters and numbers of the boxes/circles in all parts before the brackets/parentheses.

    In exams and theory books like these where there is a lot of visual stuff going on, include a transcriber's note before everything that might not read easily. So before the example for questions 20-28, write a TN that says something to the effect of "In print, lettered boxes and numbered circles enclose different notes and chords. In braille, boxes are represented by music brackets and circles by music parentheses. Letters and numbers precede each boxed or circled note or chord in all parts."

     

    (Luckily, you don't have any overlapping boxes or circles here! That gets messy, for sure!)

    Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any more questions.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: IPA in Vocal Music #38371
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi!

    Thanks for your question - for those who can't access the pdf, the question is regarding transcribing IPA as a language in an Italian  vocal piece, specifically about using the quotation marks to show the merged syllables.

    The transcription you've begun looks good so far. On line 2 of the example you sent, the closing merger quotation mark should come after the l in "il" since it's all one syllable.

    There could potentially be a problem using the quotation marks to show the merged syllables, since IPA uses dots 236 in combination with other letters for specific symbols.  (hooktop h, curly-tail j, and others.) If you can go through the entire volume/project/piece and determine that you don't have to use dots 236 for any IPA symbol, I think you're good to go with using those dots for merged syllables. (The same applies, of course, to dots 356.) If you find you have to use those dots for the IPA symbols, we'll have to think of something else to do for the merged syllables.

    Let me know if you need to figure something out with the merged syllables!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Plus sign #38359
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna!

    The plus sign above the staff indicates left hand pizzicato. In the Table 24(b) of the Code, this is illustrated as an X, but the plus sign is more commonly used (and is shown in Example 25.5.1-2.) We use dots 456, 345 (left hand sign) before a note that has a plus above it. (Usual octave indicator and dot 3 rules apply.)

    The x1 in measure 43 indicates a backward fingering extension for the cello. (It doesn't go with the arco.) As to how best to braille it - this is tricky. You may have to create a sign and explain it in a TN before the piece. I've run across "HI2" and "LO2" fingerings in string methods. I added dots 12 after the finger number to indicate LO and a dot 1 to indicate HI. You could do something like that. Or you could simply braille it as a word-sign expression before the note - but again, I'd add a TN to give the cellist a heads-up to look out for it, especially since they usually look for fingerings after a note.

    Hope this helps a little!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Unknown symbol #38291
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna!

    The slanted line under the note would be sung as a scoop or a slide into the note. For this, use the symbol for a rising straight line before a note, dots 126, 3, 14. This is taken from Table 16(E) Ornaments derived from Jazz Idioms. (Think of it as an upbow followed by a glissando!)

    I usually braille the dotted slurs as dots 5, 123, 14. Dots 5, 123 are technically the "editorial prefix" from Table 21. Add the symbol to your SS list and call it the "Dotted-line slur."

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Parallel movement #38279
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hello, Robert!

    In conferring with my committee, we agree that the parallel movement device should not be used in these instances. Reserve the use of this device to rare moments when the left hand is in parallel motion to the right hand. The solo outline is for reference - the pianist is focusing on their part - and all the info should be there.

    Thanks for a great question!

    Kathleen

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 78 total)