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  • in reply to: Lyrics and Chord Symbols … and rests #37117
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert!

    We don't actually have a responsibility when doing lead sheets like this to show the exact positioning of the chord other than the fact that it comes before the syllable. Check out Music Braille Code 2015 example 36.3.3-1 for an example like the one you sent. The second measure of the MBC2015 example begins with a quarter rest and an eighth rest, the chord sounding on the initial quarter rest of the measure.  The chord name is still simply placed two cells to the left of the initial character in the word. So whether it's one rest before the syllable or two, it is brailled the same way.

    I've attached the measure you asked about here -

    If you decide to begin a new parallel with the pickup G3 then sure. You can braille the Cdim7C on the previous parallel and begin a new parallel with "I'm" and the C chord placed under "feelin'" Either way is acceptable.

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

     

     

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    in reply to: poetry in music score #37054
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hey Christina!

    I would just braille is as poetry - with 1-3 margins - after the title and composer, before the music heading. I'd use uncontracted braille with the French accented letters.

    I don't think there is such an example in MBC2015 but I think of this as an epigraph at the start of a book chapter. (Formats 9.3.1)

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

     

    in reply to: Music Heading #36986
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Oh good grief. The sim braille took effect AFTER I hit submit! It didn't appear that way while I was typing!

    Argh. Here's print: I would do the tempo indication exactly as it appears - environs. quarter equals music parenthesis dotted quarter music parenthesis equals 51

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Kathleen.
    in reply to: Music Heading #36984
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Christina!

    What a great question!

    I am going to base my answer on the way MBC2015 treats irregular key signatures.

    I would do the tempo indication exactly as it appears - environs. quarter equals music parenthesis dotted quarter music parenthesis equals 51

    The time signatures can be indicated as right and left hand in the music heading - enclose the right hand sign in music parentheses directly before the sharp 12/8. Leave a space, enclose the left hand sign in parentheses directly before the sharp 4/4.

    I don't think you'll need to put them in the music line.

    (I can't figure out how to use simbraille in this box, so I've attached a pdf. Let me know if it doesn't make its way clearly.)

    I also don't think a footnote will be necessary for the meters. It should be clear enough this way. Or are you just referring to the long word expressions?

    Be well!

     

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    in reply to: In-Accord or Intervals? #36868
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    The image is indeed hard to see - I can't seem to enlarge it.

    However, I can answer your question.

    If you are transcribing this as a full score - all the parts included - for the purpose of score study or for a conductor, intervals are fine (read upwards in all parts). In this case the accidentals would not need to be repeated. (Perhaps it's because the image is so small, but I don't actually see an instance in these measures where this would be an issue - am I missing something?)

    If you are transcribing for a clarinet player and extracting their part from the score, in-accords need to be used - highest part first. And in that case accidentals WOULD need to be repeated for the 2nd part of the in-accord. Adding a dot 5 would indicate that the accidental does not appear before that note in print but that it is required for proper reading.

    Maybe you can send me a larger image so I can be sure that I'm reading it clearly enough...

    And so curious as to why you're using 1997 Code....

    Thanks!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Special Pedal/Pedal Up Signs or Standard Signs? #36837
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert,

    There is a difference in usage with the pedal immediately up after sign and the standard pedal up sign. And it can be ambiguous and difficult to tell the difference.

    In my experience, the pedal immediately up after indication will be printed slightly to the right of the notes, as shown in the MBC2015 example 29.10.1-3 (d). In this example, the pianist would indeed lift the pedal in measure 3 after the right hand chord is struck. (Which is also why the pedal indication is placed in the right-hand line in the braille.)

    It helps to have an understanding of how the music would be played and how the pedaling would affect the sound. If you're truly confounded, it would be advantageous to enlist the help of a pianist to find out how they would interpret the pedaling indications.

    I just did a webinar on pedaling last month for the Music Monday series. Check it out in the archives.

    As to the specifics of the piece you're working on, I'd have to see print in order to advise whether the standard pedal up would be sufficient or if it would require the use of the special signs.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Page turn indicators #36807
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    HI Robert,

    I've never seen it after a measure number and hand sign, actually. It's best on the line with the preceding measure. Sometimes this is not possible and I've had to place it on its own line below the parallel, indented two cells to the right of the hand sign.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Music Braille Transcribing/Proofreading Prices #36742
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert!

    First of all, congrats on becoming a new music transcriber!

    Rates and fees definitely vary depending on many factors. Different transcribers have different expectations, expertise, and experience levels that affect their rates. Some transcribers work as volunteers and some are transcribing as a career, so it's hard to generalize and feel confident in giving you a definitive answer. My response here should be taken as simply my personal opinion and what I've seen in the field and not as a definitive declamation of how much transcriptions should cost.

    For straight-forward music, (single-line music, line-by-line vocal, piano, etc.) prices tend to range from $7.00-$10.00 per braille page. It can vary depending on how fast you work - if you can get it turned around in a short amount of time, the rates can be higher. If it takes you 6 months to get a single-line piece of music to a client, I'd probably recommend lowering the fee.

    More complicated music can be billed at a higher rate - music that uses non-traditional notation can cost between $12-$18 per page - again also depending on the level of expertise and time it takes to get the work done.

    Proofreading tends to sit in the $2.00-$3.00 per braille page range but also depends on speed and accuracy.

    Again, these rates I've quoted are merely my experience in the field and shouldn't be seen as "this is how it should be for everyone." But I hope this gives you some sense of what is out there right now and what you can expect moving forward with your transcribing!

    Congrats again!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Braille Music Instruction questions #36711
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    Let’s see if I can help with these very good questions!

    1. No, all the music symbols do not need to be on the special symbols page. The Music Braille Code Table of Signs does include indication of symbols that need to be on a SS page – they are indicated by asterisks. Apart from that, I tend to list symbols that I need to look up when transcribing. If I have to look it up, it’s probably not very common and therefore couldn’t hurt being on the list.
    2. Braille order is like alphabetical order, but with using the dot configurations to determine the order. Section 1.1.2. of the Rules of Unified English Braille gives the braille order in a handy table that I actually printed out and put on my wall above my computer. Also, there is an index of signs at the end of the Music Braille Code that lists the symbols in braille order. It is quite useful in putting together your special symbols page.
    3. We use the note C to represent any note just hanging out without a staff (also used in unpitched percussion music).
    4. We have ways of doing fingering charts for the instruments. The method is determined by the instrument.
    5. I’m not entirely sure what you mean by this question. If we are transcribing the print into braille, there won’t be any need for the print any longer. Sometimes when we transcribe for a teacher, we will do a “facsimile” transcription, including elements that are normally omitted from braille music, such as clef signs and the like. But otherwise, I don’t see the need to have anything duplicated.

    Let me know if you need any more clarification!

     

    Kathleen

    in reply to: longer word sign expressions #36512
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Christina!

    I usually make my decisions based on the meaning of the expressions rather than solely on the font and size of the print. Here are my thoughts, and I mostly agree with what you've laid out -

    I can't see measure 1, so I'm not sure what the expression is (but you're more than likely correct in using it as a music heading).

    M 6 Cedez – relax the tempo (in the music line)

    M 8 En mesure – in time (in the music line)

    M 10 un peu retenu – holding back a little (in the music line)

    M 11 En elargissant – widening (in the music line)

    M 12 1er mouvt – first tempo (free line, music heading, applying to the second half of the measure, of course)

    M 13 Tres lointain – very distant (free line, music heading)

    What do you think?

    A lot of this is transcriber's choice, but this is what I think I'd do here.

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: music xml and conversion programs #36411
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Christina!

    I'm definitely not an expert on the software conversion programs! I experimented with a program a while ago and found the editing was too cumbersome for me to utilize. I, too, 6-key enter each and every one of my music transcriptions. It's just the fastest and easiest way for me to do my work. (I know that you can download a trial version of Dancing Dots' software if you want to try it out!)

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Strings, fingering notation L2 #36390
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Lindy,

    Sorry I can't cite any sources. None that I know of mention this and therefore there is no agreed-upon method. I've had many discussions with other transcribers about this issue. Some have suggested using a flat or a sharp before the fingering, but a flat in front of a finger number 2 would read as a downbow for the next note. Some people have used word-sign expressions before the note. I've personally used dots 12 after a fingering for the Low and a dot 1 after a fingering for Hi. Of course, whichever method you land on, add a transcriber's note to explain what you're doing.

     

    in reply to: literary notation in music braille, as shown or UEB? #36278
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Julie!

    The DeGarmo Intro to Music Braille Transcription 2005 is out of date. It is currently being revised to reflect UEB and the Music Braille Code 2015 updates. Hopefully the revised edition will be available soon!

    In the meantime, it's helpful to have the Music Braille Code 2015 by your side to look up things like this.

    We use UEB italics where they are needed, not EBAE.

    Parentheses - there are three types we use in braille music. (See MBC2015 section 1.3.) UEB literary in ordinary literary context; Music parentheses (dots 6,3) in the music. Special parentheses (dots 2356) for chord symbols, music headings, and in word-sign expressions.

    In the case of numbering vocal music verses, we use UEB parentheses. (See MBC2015 section 35.7.)

    Hope this helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: music proofreader #36267
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Julie,

    There is no certification for music proofreading. Most of us proofread for each other!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Lines of continuation with fingerings — viola #36133
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Lindy!

    The lines of continuation terminate after the last affected note. So in measure 3, the two lines would both be terminated after the D quarter note.

    Measure 9, terminate after the F; likewise in measure 10. In measures 11-15 the secondary lines (the pdf is blurry and I can't read the number - is it 2?) would all terminate after the Gs. The line for 1 would also terminate after the G in measure 15.

     

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 58 total)