Kathleen

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  • in reply to: Music Theory Exam questions #38390
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert,

    Let's see if I can help -

    Question 1 - key signatures. The braille reader should just be required to indicate the signatures as they read them in braille.

    Question 5 - adding accidentals. You could braille each whole note with a blank cell in between them, giving space to mark where a flat or sharp would go. I don't think adding lines is necessary.

    Boxes and circles - I would make them distinct, for sure. For boxes I usually use music brackets around the enclosed notes in all parts. Circles would be fine with music parentheses. Use word sign expressions with the letters and numbers of the boxes/circles in all parts before the brackets/parentheses.

    In exams and theory books like these where there is a lot of visual stuff going on, include a transcriber's note before everything that might not read easily. So before the example for questions 20-28, write a TN that says something to the effect of "In print, lettered boxes and numbered circles enclose different notes and chords. In braille, boxes are represented by music brackets and circles by music parentheses. Letters and numbers precede each boxed or circled note or chord in all parts."

     

    (Luckily, you don't have any overlapping boxes or circles here! That gets messy, for sure!)

    Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any more questions.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: IPA in Vocal Music #38371
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi!

    Thanks for your question - for those who can't access the pdf, the question is regarding transcribing IPA as a language in an Italian  vocal piece, specifically about using the quotation marks to show the merged syllables.

    The transcription you've begun looks good so far. On line 2 of the example you sent, the closing merger quotation mark should come after the l in "il" since it's all one syllable.

    There could potentially be a problem using the quotation marks to show the merged syllables, since IPA uses dots 236 in combination with other letters for specific symbols.  (hooktop h, curly-tail j, and others.) If you can go through the entire volume/project/piece and determine that you don't have to use dots 236 for any IPA symbol, I think you're good to go with using those dots for merged syllables. (The same applies, of course, to dots 356.) If you find you have to use those dots for the IPA symbols, we'll have to think of something else to do for the merged syllables.

    Let me know if you need to figure something out with the merged syllables!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Plus sign #38359
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna!

    The plus sign above the staff indicates left hand pizzicato. In the Table 24(b) of the Code, this is illustrated as an X, but the plus sign is more commonly used (and is shown in Example 25.5.1-2.) We use dots 456, 345 (left hand sign) before a note that has a plus above it. (Usual octave indicator and dot 3 rules apply.)

    The x1 in measure 43 indicates a backward fingering extension for the cello. (It doesn't go with the arco.) As to how best to braille it - this is tricky. You may have to create a sign and explain it in a TN before the piece. I've run across "HI2" and "LO2" fingerings in string methods. I added dots 12 after the finger number to indicate LO and a dot 1 to indicate HI. You could do something like that. Or you could simply braille it as a word-sign expression before the note - but again, I'd add a TN to give the cellist a heads-up to look out for it, especially since they usually look for fingerings after a note.

    Hope this helps a little!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Unknown symbol #38291
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna!

    The slanted line under the note would be sung as a scoop or a slide into the note. For this, use the symbol for a rising straight line before a note, dots 126, 3, 14. This is taken from Table 16(E) Ornaments derived from Jazz Idioms. (Think of it as an upbow followed by a glissando!)

    I usually braille the dotted slurs as dots 5, 123, 14. Dots 5, 123 are technically the "editorial prefix" from Table 21. Add the symbol to your SS list and call it the "Dotted-line slur."

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Parallel movement #38279
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hello, Robert!

    In conferring with my committee, we agree that the parallel movement device should not be used in these instances. Reserve the use of this device to rare moments when the left hand is in parallel motion to the right hand. The solo outline is for reference - the pianist is focusing on their part - and all the info should be there.

    Thanks for a great question!

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Songs with Multiple Verses #38176
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert,

    Please forgive the tardiness of this reply.

    Your answer depends on the individual piece. For a through-composed piece - one with no repeats, I think measure numbers would suffice if the verses are not specifically labeled as such.

    However, if you are transcribing the music for only the first verse of a strophic song and then brailling only the text for the remaining verses, you must list verse numbers, as seen in example 35.7-1 in the MBC2015.

    If the refrain is obvious and a part of the repeated music that is not brailled in full the second/third time around, you would label it as such, even if the label is not shown in print. (Ex. 35.7.2-1)

    Those added labels help the reader orient themselves when there are repeated portions of music that we are not transcribing in full.

    Kathleen

     

    in reply to: Combined page numbers #38127
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    This happens a lot with vocal music. I usually just start the pagination with page 3 and don't worry about the implied pages 1 and 2.

    Print pages can then be listed as 3-x.

    I don't think that will cause any confusion.

    Hope that helps!

     

    in reply to: Vocal music questions #38122
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna, please forgive the lag in answering these questions.

    1. I think either way would be fine - I don't the reader would get confused to have the word repeated but I also think it would be clear to have the word only at the end of the first ending and picking up the lyrics on the repeat.
    2. Place the words "no words" either fully capitalized or in italics on the first parallel, placing the appropriate measures' rests below. Then measure 3's lyrics would begin the second parallel.

    Sorry again for taking so long to get back to you.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Lyrics repetition #38121
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Anna,

    The code doesn't say that the lyrics repeat symbol has to be preceded by a space. But I'm not sure if it would be clear. I've never seen or used it in the middle of a sequence. I would suggest not using it if the lyrics will fit on the line.

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Lyrics and chord symbols in Introductions #37361
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert!

    I'm afraid it would be too complicated to have a runover with chord symbols. Best to have a parallel with NO WORDS and the symbols below that.

     

    Kathleen

    in reply to: Lyrics and Chord Symbols … and rests #37117
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Robert!

    We don't actually have a responsibility when doing lead sheets like this to show the exact positioning of the chord other than the fact that it comes before the syllable. Check out Music Braille Code 2015 example 36.3.3-1 for an example like the one you sent. The second measure of the MBC2015 example begins with a quarter rest and an eighth rest, the chord sounding on the initial quarter rest of the measure.  The chord name is still simply placed two cells to the left of the initial character in the word. So whether it's one rest before the syllable or two, it is brailled the same way.

    I've attached the measure you asked about here -

    If you decide to begin a new parallel with the pickup G3 then sure. You can braille the Cdim7C on the previous parallel and begin a new parallel with "I'm" and the C chord placed under "feelin'" Either way is acceptable.

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

     

     

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    in reply to: poetry in music score #37054
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hey Christina!

    I would just braille is as poetry - with 1-3 margins - after the title and composer, before the music heading. I'd use uncontracted braille with the French accented letters.

    I don't think there is such an example in MBC2015 but I think of this as an epigraph at the start of a book chapter. (Formats 9.3.1)

    Hope that helps!

    Kathleen

     

    in reply to: Music Heading #36986
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Oh good grief. The sim braille took effect AFTER I hit submit! It didn't appear that way while I was typing!

    Argh. Here's print: I would do the tempo indication exactly as it appears - environs. quarter equals music parenthesis dotted quarter music parenthesis equals 51

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by Kathleen.
    in reply to: Music Heading #36984
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi Christina!

    What a great question!

    I am going to base my answer on the way MBC2015 treats irregular key signatures.

    I would do the tempo indication exactly as it appears - environs. quarter equals music parenthesis dotted quarter music parenthesis equals 51

    The time signatures can be indicated as right and left hand in the music heading - enclose the right hand sign in music parentheses directly before the sharp 12/8. Leave a space, enclose the left hand sign in parentheses directly before the sharp 4/4.

    I don't think you'll need to put them in the music line.

    (I can't figure out how to use simbraille in this box, so I've attached a pdf. Let me know if it doesn't make its way clearly.)

    I also don't think a footnote will be necessary for the meters. It should be clear enough this way. Or are you just referring to the long word expressions?

    Be well!

     

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    in reply to: In-Accord or Intervals? #36868
    Kathleen
    Moderator

    Hi there!

    The image is indeed hard to see - I can't seem to enlarge it.

    However, I can answer your question.

    If you are transcribing this as a full score - all the parts included - for the purpose of score study or for a conductor, intervals are fine (read upwards in all parts). In this case the accidentals would not need to be repeated. (Perhaps it's because the image is so small, but I don't actually see an instance in these measures where this would be an issue - am I missing something?)

    If you are transcribing for a clarinet player and extracting their part from the score, in-accords need to be used - highest part first. And in that case accidentals WOULD need to be repeated for the 2nd part of the in-accord. Adding a dot 5 would indicate that the accidental does not appear before that note in print but that it is required for proper reading.

    Maybe you can send me a larger image so I can be sure that I'm reading it clearly enough...

    And so curious as to why you're using 1997 Code....

    Thanks!

    Kathleen

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 68 total)