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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 38 total)
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  • in reply to: One-word swtich in embedded music? #22885
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Hi, Ed. Good to hear from you. Long time no see!

    I'm sorry for the delay in getting back to you. There was a technical glitch with my password and I couldn't get on to answer you.

    There is no "one-word switch" for music code in a literary context. Happily, the music and literary prefixes are now recognized in UEB, and the signs for the accidentals have been incorporated.

    More good news: BANA has approved it, and the new update of Music Braille Code will soon be available.

    Cheers to you.
    Larry

    in reply to: UEB symbols for accidentals #22757
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Hi, Ed. It's been a long time.

    Yes, when in literary context, the narrative parts of texts, the two-cell UEB symbols should be used instead of writing out "sharp" or "flat" as we have done in the past. If a chord symbol or chord progression is being used as an entity, it should be prefaced by the music prefix and the single-cell sign from the music code employed. There will be cases, like the third example in Section 3.18.1 of UEB, when the transcriber will have to decide whether the item in question is music notation or is continuous literary material. Either will be correct; the transcriber should be consistent within a given transcription.

    Good to hear from you!

    in reply to: Alto Clarinet Fingering Chart #22668
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Charles,

    There is a good example of a clarinet fingering chart in the Handbook for Braille Music Transcribers, 3rd Edition, available from NBA.

    Larry

    in reply to: pagination #22644
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Hello Susan,
    Larry is correct. If you are using Formats textbook pagination (which in this case, I would) then place the print page number in the upper right, braille page number in the lower right, full row of dots 36 at page turnovers. If you have other questions along the way, feel free to post them here and I will try my best to answer them for everyone to learn. -Heidi

    in reply to: pagination #22643
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Hi, Susan,

    My immediate response is that you are either doing the document as a music transcription or as a textbook. If textbook, you should use the pagination of FORMATS, treating all music as "displayed material."

    However, I've emailed Heidi Lehmann to ask her to answer your question, since she has a lot more experience with textbooks than I have. If you don't hear from her soon, you might email her or give her a ring.

    Larry

    in reply to: Non-UEB enclosure #22640
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Cindi, please ignore my question. I did finally find the umlaut under "diaeresis." Sorry to bother you. As you know, The Rules of EUB is a very devil to search.

    in reply to: Symbol not regonized #22566
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Thank you for your patience, Charles. It took me a while to get the images so I could read them. Also, this is the second time I have answered. The system rejected the first attempt. I hope this one goes through.

    You should use the signs for x-shaped and diamond-shaped note-heads from Table 1(B). Refer to Par. 1.7.
    I would use italics as they occur in the lyrics.
    To keep the music cohesive, I would use numbered asterisks and footnotes in the music lines for all of the stage directions.
    For the straight line upward with "Oops!" and the arched wavy line with "Bba-a-h!" you have a choice: you could invent signs, or you could describe the devices in footnotes. I favor the footnote.
    For the measure with two solo parts, I'd use an in-accord in the music and parentheses in the words.

    Larry

    in reply to: Symbol not regonized #22565
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Is anyone going to answer the questio?

    in reply to: De Garmo #22568
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Second thought: you should ask John Hanson at NLS. It's their publication.

    in reply to: De Garmo #22569
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Susan,

    There has been no new version of the De Garmo since 2002. That Second Edition is the latest.
    Larry

    in reply to: Carets meaning half step #22484
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Larry,
    More thoughts.. I like the portamento symbol for the end of the book, where they are only using the numbers, dashes, and carets.

    However, we have not fully addressed my question about the fingering with the minus sign, at the beginning of the book. The .pdf I sent is the one that is upside down (sorry). Do you recommend skipping the minus (dash) signs? What about the footnote that the author includes?

    I will hold this volume until I hear from you on this issue.

    Thanks,
    Dorothy

    in reply to: Carets meaning half step #22483
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Dear Dorothy,

    I must apologize. The forum website is sometimes unpredictable. I check it at least twice a day, and your first message did not come up until your follow-up arrived.

    The sign for a shift is the same as a portamento (4, 1). The caret for a half-step is not standard music notation, so you have to make something up, and I think your word-sign h is intuitive and sensible. Congratulations.

    Larry

    in reply to: X4 fingering, Suzuki violin book #22248
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Ruth Rozen, our string expert, sent me a copy from a Suzuki cello book where she is going to meet the same situation. A footnote there says "Closed hand position is marked with O. Open hand position is marked with X." The Xs and Os in this one appear between notes, not adjacent to the finger number. I recommend that you and Ruth discuss this challenge off-list and let us know what you can suggest. If you don't have Ruth's contact info, I'll give it to you off-list.

    My thought, as a starting point, would be to treat these markings as word-sign expressions, explained on the TN page. Where they occur between notes, that is where I would put them in the braille. Under the music braille rules, they cannot come between the note and the fingering, so if the X is given with the fingering 4 in your violin book, I'd put the word-sign X before the note. A TN is necessary in any case.

    in reply to: X4 fingering, Suzuki violin book #22249
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Karen, I'm going to have to ask a string player about this one. I'll get back to you as soon as I can.

    By the way, is this message still waiting since last October? I thought I was up to date with the forum.

    in reply to: Bracket above two notes to indicate same finger #22431
    LarrySmith
    Participant

    Ruth's advice is to show the bracket using the signs for brackets above or below the staff and leave it to the teacher to interpret it.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 38 total)