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  • in reply to: capital passage question #35191
    claurent
    Moderator

    CHAPTER TWO WHERE CRAZY MEETS CULTURE is a single related heading…it should be one passage. It can be on two separate lines (no blank between).

    Cindi

    in reply to: omitted diagram format question #35153
    claurent
    Moderator

    If you are describing a picture, you are not omitting it. What you suggested is exactly right!

    Cindi

    in reply to: poetry question #35116
    claurent
    Moderator

    Based on the picture, I think you could safely put the solidus in cell 1 as it is in the same place in print as the lines of the poem.  But 1/5 works also 🙂

    Cindi

    in reply to: poetry question #35109
    claurent
    Moderator

    What margins are you using for the poem?

    Cindi

    in reply to: poetry question #35107
    claurent
    Moderator

    Follow print.  Put them on a line by themselves and use dots 456, 34, 456, 34.

    Cindi

     

     

    in reply to: Special symbols page: check mark #35008
    claurent
    Moderator

    The checkmark symbol was updated by ICEB some time ago. The correct symbol is dot 4, dots 146. It should be listed as a checkmark.

    Cindi

    in reply to: table flexibility? #34910
    claurent
    Moderator

    Braille readers read across the page – changing a table as you have suggested may make it actually harder for the reader to understand and follow.  There are no rules in Braille Formats that allow for changing a single column table to multiple columns.  Space-saving is not the issue that it once was.  All that to say that no, it is not recommended that a table be changed from a single column to multiple columns.

    Cindi

    in reply to: NIMAS File Conversion #34528
    claurent
    Moderator

    Not to pass the buck here – but would you please post this to the Computer-Assisted Transcription forum?  I don’t use either Duxbury or BrailleBlaster and while I might be able to give you an answer, it might not be the best answer you could get. 🙂

    Cindi

    in reply to: Instructional Spanish Books – Willie #34524
    claurent
    Moderator

    I’m reposting the “text” of your file here:

    ———

    We do instructional Spanish textbooks of varying levels. Largely they are English based with instructions in both English and Spanish. We use the accented letter signs from World Braille Usage (Method 3), but I have a question about the inverted question mark and exclamation point.

    The fifth example in Rules of UEB, section 13.6.4 uses the ¿ (26) for the inverted question mark as well as signs from World Braille Usage:

    [example omitted]

    and the example from 13.7.2 uses the UEB 3-cell symbol for the inverted exclamation mark while using accented letter signs from World Braille Usage:

    [example omitted]

    It seems a tad confusing as to which inverted symbols to use in method 3.

    When doing instructional Spanish books is it preferable to use the inverted punctuation from UEB or World Braille Usage? Or is it a decision left to the transcriber and/or student? Your responses are always appreciated.

    <hr />

    Quoting from the BANA Document, When using Method 3, the foreign language signs for accented letters are used as needed in foreign text, though all other signs (e.g., punctuation) may be in UEB.

    UEB punctuation is generally used when Method 3 is the chosen Method.  Method 4 would use all of the foreign language symbols – including punctuation of any kind.  However, the use of the word “may” in the BANA document does allow for some leeway.  Just be consistent.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Braille Formats #34470
    claurent
    Moderator

    My question concerns font attributes in headers. In Braille Formats section 4.3.7 it says “Ignore font attributes in centered, cell-5, and cell-7 headings, except when required for distinction.”

    Does this mean “when required” for grammar distinction (like a book’s title)? Or formatting distinction? Or both? For example, a header looking like this

    <picture omitted

    Was transcribed by a transcriber using bold like this:

    Would it have be preferable to leave the bold out?

     

    Some type of emphasis is required in order to distinguish “Shared Read” from the rest…so what was done by the transcriber is good.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Braille Formats #34464
    claurent
    Moderator

    The attachment did not upload.  Please try again.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Capital Passages and a semi-colon #34409
    claurent
    Moderator

    The semi colon does NOT make this two separate items.  In the AM example, the 11:00 AM is not related to what follows…and it helps with reader understanding to keep the capitals separate for them.  In your example, they ARE related…and should be capitalized as one passage.

    See 8.5.4 of UEB.

    Cindi

    claurent
    Moderator

    I would suggest doing each quadrant as a separate braille page.

    I don’t think this picture will mean anything to a braille reader anyway and larger quadrants would allow the student to still complete the activity…

    Cindi

    claurent
    Moderator

    This answer applies to all three questions.

    Quotation marks are a bit confusing.

    As of today (and much discussion is going on so keep aware of any changes) use the one cell quotation marks (dots 236, and dots 356) for any double quotation marks used in a book if there is one type of print double quotation marks.  It doesn’t matter if they are slanted or straight quotes…as long as they are all the same.  According to Braille Formats Appendix G, these symbols do not need to be listed on the Special Symbols page.

    If you also have single quotes in the same book, use the single braille quotes (dots 6, 236 and dots 6, 356).  These symbols are not required on the Special Symbols page (although it is noted in Appendix G that the closing single quote is new and MAY be listed- and if the closing single quote is listed, I would also list the opening single quote for consistency).

    If the book has more than one type of double quote marks and they are used for different things, then the two-cell symbols for quotes should be used to represent one of the two types…and a note would be required so the reader knows which braille symbol represents which type of quote.

    I realize that 7.6.1 of UEB says that the nonspecific quotation marks are required on the special symbols page or in a TN, but Braille Formats does not require these symbols to be listed unless there is some reason to explain the print form.

    As for what description to use … if you are going to go with 7.6.1 and list the nonspecific quotation marks, then you must follow the rest of 7.6.1 and state what the print form is as part of your description (are they straight quotes, curly quotes, etc).  And to be honest, if only one type of double quote is used, I think it really only matters that they are quotes…making it unnecessary to put them on the Special Symbols page as the “regular” braille double quotes have been used for a long time and are likely known to the braille reader already.

    As I said earlier, I do know that quotation marks continue to be a subject of discussion on the ICEB code maintenance committee listserve – and they are working to clarify the symbols and the usage for them.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Footnotes #34001
    claurent
    Moderator

    If you are inserting endnotes into the text as reference notes, you should follow the rules for reference notes.  Treat them as unmarked notes (see BF 16.4).  Insert a transcriber’s note within the text following the material to which the note applies.  Place the notes at the end of the print page (using a note separation line as detailed in BF 16.5).  Use margins 1-3 for the notes.   Be sure to put a transcriber’s note on the TN page stating that you are moving the notes.

    Cindi

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 443 total)