claurent

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 431 total)
  • Author
    Posts

  • claurent
    Moderator

    I would suggest doing each quadrant as a separate braille page.

    I don’t think this picture will mean anything to a braille reader anyway and larger quadrants would allow the student to still complete the activity…

    Cindi


    claurent
    Moderator

    This answer applies to all three questions.

    Quotation marks are a bit confusing.

    As of today (and much discussion is going on so keep aware of any changes) use the one cell quotation marks (dots 236, and dots 356) for any double quotation marks used in a book if there is one type of print double quotation marks.  It doesn’t matter if they are slanted or straight quotes…as long as they are all the same.  According to Braille Formats Appendix G, these symbols do not need to be listed on the Special Symbols page.

    If you also have single quotes in the same book, use the single braille quotes (dots 6, 236 and dots 6, 356).  These symbols are not required on the Special Symbols page (although it is noted in Appendix G that the closing single quote is new and MAY be listed- and if the closing single quote is listed, I would also list the opening single quote for consistency).

    If the book has more than one type of double quote marks and they are used for different things, then the two-cell symbols for quotes should be used to represent one of the two types…and a note would be required so the reader knows which braille symbol represents which type of quote.

    I realize that 7.6.1 of UEB says that the nonspecific quotation marks are required on the special symbols page or in a TN, but Braille Formats does not require these symbols to be listed unless there is some reason to explain the print form.

    As for what description to use … if you are going to go with 7.6.1 and list the nonspecific quotation marks, then you must follow the rest of 7.6.1 and state what the print form is as part of your description (are they straight quotes, curly quotes, etc).  And to be honest, if only one type of double quote is used, I think it really only matters that they are quotes…making it unnecessary to put them on the Special Symbols page as the “regular” braille double quotes have been used for a long time and are likely known to the braille reader already.

    As I said earlier, I do know that quotation marks continue to be a subject of discussion on the ICEB code maintenance committee listserve – and they are working to clarify the symbols and the usage for them.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Footnotes #34001

    claurent
    Moderator

    If you are inserting endnotes into the text as reference notes, you should follow the rules for reference notes.  Treat them as unmarked notes (see BF 16.4).  Insert a transcriber’s note within the text following the material to which the note applies.  Place the notes at the end of the print page (using a note separation line as detailed in BF 16.5).  Use margins 1-3 for the notes.   Be sure to put a transcriber’s note on the TN page stating that you are moving the notes.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Grade K Books #33995

    claurent
    Moderator

    While there are some things I might do differently, overall what I see looks good.  Here are a few things I would like to point out:

    1. The matter from the front of the book should begin on a new braille page (each type of preliminary material should begin on a new braille page).  The page change indicators (rows of 36) would then not be necessary.
    2. I would suggest that the material from the inside back cover be placed at the back of the book.  The information makes no sense if the book has not yet been read.  You could treat it as implied print page 9 rather than as cover information.
    3. On print pages 1-2, the repeated title and author information is not necessary in my opinion.  That information is on the title page (and included in the full title on this braille page).  Even if the author information is included, you do not have to repeat the title (my opinion).
    4. Without explaining the pictures, the point of this story does not come across.  Simple picture descriptions would help:  on page 2 you could say “Picture: the mouse shares a doll” on page 3, “Picture: the monkey shares a toy car” and so on.

    Hope this helps!  Let me know if you have other questions.

    Cindi

    in reply to: block vs indented paragraph #33985

    claurent
    Moderator

    So sorry! I thought I had answered this (in fact, I’m sure I did but it must not have uploaded).  Follow print for paragraphs – so block or indent as print has done.  In the sample you’ve attached, you will have both types of paragraphs.  BF 1.9 speaks to this.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Check Mark Inside Box #33948

    claurent
    Moderator

    Here is my suggestion:  Make the question a heading (centered or cell 5); use the square symbol with a grade 1 indicator in front of it (dots 56, 1246, 3456, 145) for the boxes, use the checkmark (dot 4, 146) in front of the item that is checked [list these items in 1-3].  If the checkmark is not used elsewhere in the book, you can identify it on the Special Symbols page (or in a TN at the site) as as a checkmark in a box.  Then block the paragraph at the bottom.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Chapter heading #33926

    claurent
    Moderator

    Although Formats does not specifically state this (other than where it applies to lists) the intent is that the reader have no problem understanding when a change in print context occurs…so if something ends on line 24 or 25 of a braille page that requires a blank line following it, leave line 1 of the next braille page blank.  In this case, it is the centered heading that requires a blank line preceding it…Braille Formats DOES say that a heading can be on line 1 of a braille page if there is no running head (and it does not address what is on the previous braille page).  So it IS confusing!

    In your case, I would consider how long the centered heading is and whether or not it might cause the reader some confusion as to whether or not it is a change in print context.  If it is an especially long heading, I would definitely leave line 1 blank.  If it is a shorter heading, there would likely be no confusion due to the number of blank cells preceding the heading so the heading could be placed on line 1.

    I’m sorry that there is no specific rule or guideline to support this!  The BANA Formats committee is looking into clarifying the rule that relates to text ending on lines 24/25 and I hope that it will take away some of this confusion.  For now, you must do what is best for your reader.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Chapter heading #33918

    claurent
    Moderator

    What starts each chapter? A centered heading? Do chapters start on new print pages?

    Cindi

    in reply to: Slash and ing contraction #33805

    claurent
    Moderator

    There is nothing in the UEB rules about not using the ing contraction before a slash…the “beginning of the word” rule would not apply here as neither ing’s in your example is at the beginning of the word.

    You are correct, you CAN use ing before the slash.

    Cindi

    in reply to: Being #33743

    claurent
    Moderator

    The correct way is (be)(ing).  The contraction for be should be used (besides when it is standing alone!) when it appears at the beginning of a word and makes up the first syllable.  It’s called a lower groupsign (UEB 10.6).  It must also be followed by a letter, contraction or modified letter in order to use the contraction.

    In words like being, begin, beware, the letters be make up the first syllable so the contraction should be used.  In words like benediction, beneficial, beat, bedspread, the letters be do NOT make up the first syllable (ben-, beat, bed-) so the contraction for be cannot be used.

    Cindi

     

     

    in reply to: Italics #33739

    claurent
    Moderator

    UEB actually allows either way.  If you can tell that the emphasis in question does not apply to the punctuation in print, then print should be followed.  If you can’t tell, you should choose to include or not include and then be consistent.

    Good job finding it in the code book!

    Cindi

    in reply to: 3 dot 5s #33695

    claurent
    Moderator

    It is not a UEB symbol.  It is based on the blank entries in a table discussed in 11.16…with the onset of UEB we are to follow print more closely but just leaving a blank space where there is a blank space in print could lead to the student missing the fact that something is to be filled in.  It is, essentially, a series of guide dots to lead the reader across the blank space (while also making it clear that there is blank space).  A transcriber’s note is required (either on the TN page or at the site) letting the reader know that the 3 dots 5s indicate a blank space in print.

    Cindi

    in reply to: END OF VOLUME ? #33689

    claurent
    Moderator

    Hmmm…well, there definitely is no rule that covers this.  All I can give you is my opinion.

    It seems wrong to put “The End” on a volume when the student does not have all of the volumes…even if the material in that 4th supplement is the end of the print book.  The supplements are used as reference materials – which is why they are often transcribed early on.

    I would agree with you that “End of Supplement 4” makes the most sense at this point in your work.  Then I would put “The End” at the end of Volume 40.  I would assume that your title page says “In 40 volumes and 4 supplements” which should be explanation enough for the reader to know what is going on.

    I will add this to the list of things that need clarifying when an errata is created for Braille Formats.  Thanks for the question!

    Cindi

    in reply to: Enlarged dots #33669

    claurent
    Moderator

    The symbol for the mid-line dot should be used (456, 256 – the bullet).

    Cindi

    in reply to: Computer Notation #33666

    claurent
    Moderator

    In the example above – apple2cks.com – a grade 1 symbol indicator is used after the 2 in order to tell the reader that the c is a letter c and not the number 3.  The grade 1 indicator terminates numeric mode but does not terminate grade 1 mode (which is set by the numeric indicator).  In your example, that works because there are no contractions in the web address.

    If you had the website 2019raceforthefunofit.com you would want the grade 1 terminator after 2019 so that you can use contractions in the remainder of the web address.  The numeric indicator sets both grade 1 mode and numeric mode; the grade 1 terminator terminates both.

    If you have 2000cansofspaghetti.com you would also want the grade 1 terminator.  If you used the grade 1 symbol indicator after 2000, it would tell the reader that the c is not a 3, but it would not terminator grade 1 mode and, as such, the contractions in of and spaghetti could not be used – and you would want to use them.

    Cindi

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 431 total)