Lindy Walton

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  • in reply to: Conflict between Nemeth Code and Tactile graphics code #42637
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    This example from the Tactile graphics guidelines (Example 6-17) differs from the one in your first note because the labels in the 6-17 graphic are in UEB. The key list is rendered in the same code (UEB) which is why the Nemeth switch indicators are applied individually to the three labels. Keeping in mind that the items in a key are read as needed when the reader encounters them in the drawing, the transcription shown in Example 6-17 makes sense.

    in reply to: excessive switching #42635
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    It has come to my attention that using a single letter in a key causes conflicts with the rules of our codes. I would like to suggest that you use a numeric key for this particular item. Upper-cell numbers are used for keys constructed in Nemeth and will work well in this case.

    Lindy

    in reply to: excessive switching #42620
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    A key can be transcribed in either code -- UEB or Nemeth. In your sample, every item being keyed is Nemeth, so I would suggest that you open Nemeth after "below:" and terminate Nemeth right before the closing TN indicator.

    In Nemeth, an alphabetic key consists of two or three lower-case English letters. [NC 26.9.3] Single-letter keys are not mentioned in the Nemeth code. You could use a numeric key (with upper-cell numerals).

    [FORMER TEXT REMOVED. SEE FOLLOW-UP RESPONSE.]

    Keys read the same in either code (upper-cell numbers for a numeric key; no contractions for an alphabetic key of two or three letters). You do not need to insert an opening Nemeth Code indicator before the graphic.

    - Lindy

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by Lindy Walton.
    in reply to: Logarithms in Exponents #42597
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Dawn.

    These certainly are a challenge. Please see the attached file where I hope I explain this special rule to your satisfaction. If not, please keep asking.

    Lindy

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    in reply to: no contractions in Nemeth #42566
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Here is what I found, Julie.

    Rule 4.6.8.b (words); Rule 4.8.10 (row headings in tables); Rule 10.5 (abbreviations in mathematical context); Rule 25.10.1 (text in a comment in a spatial arrangement)

    See also page B-4 in Appendix B regarding remarks and tables.

    - Lindy

    in reply to: Rules 14.7 & 14.8.2 #42553
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    The transcription is an accurate representation of the print notation.

    - Lindy

    in reply to: punctuation indicator after identifier #42538
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Julie.

    Section 8.2 "Use of the Punctuation Indicator" is the main rule. Identifiers can be numbers, Roman numerals, or letters. Here are the subsections to cite.

    8.2.2   The punctuation indicator is used after any numeric symbol written inside the switches.

    8.2.3   The punctuation indicator is used after a Roman numeral written inside the switches.

    8.2.7   The punctuation indicator is used after a "single letter".

     

    Until an index is created for the code book, I recommend using the electronic version which is easy to search for key words. You can also click on the section number in the Table of Contents and it will send you to that section immediately.

    --Lindy

    in reply to: Nemeth Factorial Symbol #42442
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    I would like to add that a subtlety in the Nemeth code narrative is that the word "sign" is used for the print character and "symbol" is used for the braille character. Keeping this in mind may help you as you read the rules.

    - Lindy

    in reply to: cancellation situation #42308
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi John. This is a very interesting puzzle.

    See the attached brf file for the basic problems, which you can hopefully put into the method which you have established in this unusual layout. It looks messy at first glance, but if read vertically, as intended, it makes sense and follows all of the established Nemeth rules regarding alignment with cancellation and with regrouping numbers.

    I think a transcriber's note would be helpful in this case where you have multiple lines of cancelled items. Something like "Red replacement numbers are located above each cancelled digit."

    Let me know if this isn't working and we can try another approach.

    - Lindy

     

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    in reply to: underlined letter in lyrics #40914
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Thanks for your reply, Kathleen! The curved line indicating syllable elision is typical and very familiar to me but I had never seen the added underlining before.

    in reply to: Transcriber’s note referencing identifier numbers #40912
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Connie. This is an interesting question because the transcriber's note is describing the print. I would still transcribe them in Nemeth, as they will be transcribed within the actual text.

    I think you added the bold to point out the focus of your question, but if you are retaining the bold you can refer to Sample 11 of Graphing Calculator Guidelines (page 46) which shows X3T and Y3T within the narrative, also in bold print. The simbraille is on page 47.

    Lindy

    in reply to: simple fractions in equations #40887
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    When numerator and denominator are printed at the same level of writing, you are correct not to use opening and closing fraction indicators. You do need to transcribe this using Nemeth symbols, inside the switches. There will be only one numeric indicator, before the 4 in your example.

    _% #4_/6-1_/3 _:

    I am happy to be able to refer you to the newly published 2022 edition of the Nemeth code, Rule 13.3.2.

    Lindy

    in reply to: Colon followed by equal sign #40829
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Yes, that is correct. Do not space before the colon when it appears on the same line as the y, in this case.

    in reply to: Colon followed by equal sign #40826
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Here are my thoughts on the symbol :=

    Because the symbol has been defined to mean "is defined as equal to" it is one sign so should not be broken up.

    If the expression fit on one line, there would be no space before the colon. A punctuation indicator would precede it. So it will be a 4-cell symbol, with a space following the equals sign. (456, 25, 46, 13, space)

    This expression does not fit on one line. Our division rules say to divided before a comparison sign on the baseline of writing. I feel that the first runover line can begin with the punctuation indicator. This is an unusual formation so you should identify the symbol in a transcriber's note. Something like this: "The symbol ___ means "is defined as equal to". It is printed as a colon immediately followed by an equals sign."

    I see no discrepancy in the division sites you have chosen. I am tempted, however, to make an exception to "displayed" format here and start the expression in cell 1, after a blank line. This will allow you to keep the "C" portions together on one line. This is breaking a format rule, but there are times when it benefits the reader to do so.

    I think you need to insert a space after the word "Gain" as I believe it is a function name.

    See the attached brf file for my suggested transcription of this long expression.

    I invite anyone to chime in if my solution is problematic.

    - Lindy

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    in reply to: Colon followed by equal sign #40822
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Connie.

    Yes, I have seen this symbol before and have wondered how to handle it. It will take me some time to go through my notes. I'll get back to you soon.

    Lindy

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 373 total)