Lindy Walton

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  • in reply to: Single Word Switch Clarification #39000
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Beverly.

    Actually, there is nothing on this page that requires Nemeth. Use the UEB low line (underscore) for the blanks, and contract the word "and".

    .- & .- IS .-4

    In another setting, regarding the use of the single-word switch indicator in Nemeth context, although its use is limited to only one word at a time, it can be used more than once in a sentence as long as there is Nemeth between them.

    Lindy

    in reply to: perpendicular symbol as a subscript #38984
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    How interesting!

    Since the perpendicular sign is not functioning as a comparison sign here, you are correct to transcribe it as you would any other subscript.

    _% R;$P",F _:

    in reply to: Negation or Not sign #38970
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Katrina. The negation symbol you have described is one of several symbols used in logic to denote negation. Since this particular print sign is not listed in the Nemeth Code, you can replace it with any of the other negation symbols as long as you explain in a transcriber's note, and as long as the symbol you choose is not also used in print in this context. I have attached an image from Wikipedia that shows other options. The tilde would be my first choice. "Np" would be my second choice.

    Please let me know if you need further advice.

    Lindy

     

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    in reply to: Table- Nemeth column headings, UEB row headings? #38843
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Cheri. Thank you for your question. This is an interesting example because one of the column headings does indeed require Nemeth, and the row headings are words.

    As with any table, there is more than one way to transcribe this. My first priority when setting up a table that will be used in a classroom setting is to have the layout match print as much as possible. The second priority is not to overuse keying or transcriber's notes, since that tends to take the reader's attention away from the table itself.

    In this table, the issues are not really the row headings. There are only two contractions in those words, so transcribing them in UEB or in Nemeth doesn't change the spacing issues.

    Here is what I would do with this table. Write a transcriber's note that "x" means "Partner 1(x)" and that "y" means "Partner 2(y)". Now all you need to do is switch to Nemeth for the "d-squared" column heading. See BRF example, attached.

    I don't know why there is no space between 1 and (x), between 2 and (y). I followed print and I transcribed 1(x) and 2(y) in UEB.

    Lindy

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    in reply to: down tack #38818
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    HI Deborah.

    The Nemeth Code does not have a symbol for the "down tack". You get to devise one! I'll ask for some advice and get back to you soon.

    Lindy

    in reply to: Nemeth with UEB graphics #38668
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    It sounds like you have the right idea. The decision whether or not to switch to Nemeth for a graphic is the same, really, as switching decisions within the narrative. A tactile graphic is not in any "code" per se -- it is the braille symbols associated with it, such as labels or keyed items, that obey the rules of UEB or Nemeth, as appropriate.

    There are spacing issues in a graphic, however. If the labels can all be done in UEB, do so. If, however, a label requires a switch to Nemeth, it is ideal to place the switch indicators out of the way of the graphic -- that is, open Nemeth, blank line, graphic (with Nemeth labels), blank line, terminate Nemeth (if needed).

    This will encompass the entire page only if the drawing itself takes the entire page. If the page has text before the graphic, open Nemeth after the text. The opening Nemeth Code indicator can go on the same line as the narrative, but if it doesn't fit, put it in cell 1 on the next line. The blank line the precedes the graphic will be on the following line.

    An exception is made regarding Cartesian graphs, which may be transcribed without the use of code switch indicators as long as the omission is clearly stated on the Transcriber's Notes page.

    Code switching needs to be considered individually with each graphic.

    Lindy

    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Don't you just love puzzles? If I understand this right, the four answer choices (T A L E) are shared among the three questions (1 2 3). I expect the instructions come first and perhaps apply to several problems in the riddle puzzle?

    Braille Formats Section 10 gives guidelines for exercise material. I'm sure you've read them. I think you need to be creative with your worksheet.

    I would draw the triangle first, followed by the four shared answer choices (listed in cell 3), then the three questions (listed in cell 1). Keep it all together on the same page. Disregard the circles around the letters and numbers.

    I'll sketch it out, below. (You will use the horizontal-fraction-line fraction style shown in your image.)

    (switch to Nemeth)
    -----------blank line
    [graphic]
    -----------blank line
    T 12/13
    A 5/13
    L 13/5
    E 5/12
    -----------blank line
    1 sin A
    2 cos A
    3 tan A
    -----------blank line

    If your layout doesn't seem clear to the reader, compose a short transcriber's note. Something like "Four lettered answer choices are given before each set of numbered questions."

    Another idea is to insert "Answer Choices" as a transcriber's note before each list of answer choices and "Questions" before each list of questions. The TNs in cell 5 (like a cell-5 heading) and each list in cell 1. This would require a lot of code switching, however, since the TNs must be in UEB.

    You might like to run your question by the Braille Formats forum and see what other folks suggest.

    Thanks for your puzzling question.

    Lindy

    in reply to: web address with equal signs in UEB with Nemeth #38607
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    The BANA Nemeth committee is advising that you follow UEB rules and use UEB symbols for web addresses.

    On your Special Symbols page, I suggest specifying the context in which the UEB "math" symbol is used. For example, "Equals sign used in web address"

    Lindy

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by Lindy Walton.
    in reply to: Splitting Mathematical Expressions #38604
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    I'm happy to see your question because there has been much misinterpretation of this rule. Current recommendations under discussion are that you need not divide at every location "higher on the priority list". Regarding the example you sent, you are correct that the (red) baseline indicator attached to the plus symbol should begin the runover line, however it is not necessary to divide again before the final addend (blue). The second example (Example 15.16-4 in the Provisional edition of the Nemeth lesson manual) shows a grouped expression that will not fit on the line. In my opinion, it does not need to be divided further. It is not necessary to divide before the division symbol.

    You will be happy to know that the upcoming new edition of the Nemeth Code and the upcoming new edition of the Nemeth instruction manual will be presenting much clearer guidelines to follow when faced with a long mathematical expression that requires division between lines. Until their release, I am happy to address your questions in this forum.

    Lindy

    in reply to: worded fraction #38599
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    This entire statement is a mathematical expression. Start with an opening Nemeth Code indicator and a space; end with a space and a Nemeth Code terminator. Embedded or displayed, you will need to start a new line with the comparison sign (equals) and also start a new line with the operation sign (diagonal fraction line).

    Using the example in your post, fraction indicators are not used because the numerator and denominator are each printed on the baseline of writing and there is no difference in type size. The letter E in the numerator does not need an English-letter indicator because it is not followed by a space. (Even though it will end the braille line, it would not be followed by a space were it touching the fraction line.) All words will be uncontracted.

    This simbraille uses a 40-cell line.

    _% ,P(,E)
    .K NUMBER OF OUTCOMES CORRESPONDING TO
    THE EVENT ,E
    _/TOTAL NUMBER OF EQUALLY LIKELY
    OUTCOMES _:

    in reply to: Underline in UEB with Nemeth #38545
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi Laurie. Your question certainly makes me pause. This has been a topic of debate for a long time. Here is my advice. The Nemeth Code tells us to disregard typeform if it is not mathematically significant. Section 34.b: "When any material, mathematical or literary, is printed in non-regular type that has no mathematical significance, the variant type form must not be represented in the transcription."

    I would not underline "top 3%" in the braille transcription. If you feel the student will be missing a hint that the print readers get from the underlining, you can inform the reader by means of a transcriber's note that "top 3%" is underlined in print.

    Hope this helps.

    Lindy

    in reply to: Graphing Calculator #38524
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    James Williams has some answers and suggestions for you.

    Section 6.2 of the Graphing Calculator Guidelines does say no spaces before or after the keystroke Y=, but the examples given on pages 16 and 20 are referring to actual graphing screens, not keystrokes. An example of the Y= keystroke can be found on pages 10 (print) and 11 (braille), as indicated by the post's author, and follows Section 6.2. More examples reinforcing Section 6.2 appear on pages 36 (print) and 40 (braille), pages 43 (print) and 44 (braille), and pages 56 (print) and 57 (braille).

    As for keystrokes not shown in boxes, I would say to use the keystroke indicator since GCG 2.1 states "The keystroke may be shown in print text with brackets, a clear or shaded rectangular box, a clear rectangular box with rounded corners, etc." The "etc." leaves wiggle-room here. I would put a note on the TN page regarding how the keystrokes are presented in print. All keystrokes are transcribed within Nemeth switches (GCG 2.2).

    In addition, I would offer a caveat to the transcriber regarding the context of the "keystroke," especially if all keystrokes and references to screens in general are fully-capped. From the example given, that last "STAT" might refer to the "STAT" screen and not necessarily a "STAT" key since the last keystroke used in the example was "ENTER." A reference to the "STAT" screen would follow GC 3 and be brailled as it would appear on the screen (double-capped and uncontracted), but not within switch indicators. Samples 1 and 9 show how to treat references to screens within surrounding text. Sample 12 specifically shows the "STAT PLOTS" menu as both a reference in surrounding text and as a screen.

    Hope this helps! Let us know if you have further questions.

     

    in reply to: Hypercomplex fraction #38520
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hi, Susan.
    The parentheses don't have an impact on the Nemeth Code's definition of a complex or hypercomplex fraction.

    You have three fractions here.
    --The first one (the anchor) is a simple fraction. The words in the numerator and the denominator will be uncontracted.
    --The second fraction (the first link) is a complex fraction.
    --The third fraction (the second link) contains the simple fraction "r over n".

    The Nemeth Code defines "complex fraction" as follows. A complex fraction is one whose numerator, denominator, or both, contains at least one simple fraction.

    It goes on to say that a fraction is not a complex fraction if the only simple fractions it contains are at the superscript or subscript level. That is not the case with your example.

    There are no hypercomplex fractions in the expression. To be a hypercomplex fraction, the numerator, denominator, or both, must contain at least one complex fraction.

    The complex fraction indicators and fraction line start with one dot 6.

    Opening Complex Fraction Indicator (6, 1456)

    Horizontal Complex Fraction Lind (6, 34)

    Closing Complex Fraction Indicator (6, 3456)

    --Lindy

     

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    in reply to: Excel spreadsheets the formulae #38519
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Sorry for the delay. We feel that Nemeth symbols should be used, and that the spacing should follow print. I can see how there are times the transcription will be ambiguous. Those cases may benefit from a transcriber's note explaining. Are you disregarding the capitals? If so, the commas will be unlikely to be misread.

    Please send examples of formulae that you find to be difficult. It would be interesting to see how they look in braille.

    Thank you for your question.

    Lindy

    in reply to: Letter Permutations in Nemeth #38518
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    What an interesting question!

    My *opinion* is that the word BANANA in the sentence can be in UEB, but the permutations should be in Nemeth. Each letter will be individually capitalized in the permutations. If the UEB word contained contractions, you would not use them.

    This brings up a fond memory of Dr. Nemeth's sense of humor when he suggested that the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) change its name to the Braille and Nemeth Authority of North America (BANANA).

    Lindy

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 300 total)