Patrick Janson

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  • in reply to: French liaison of sound symbol #38353
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Jill,

    Our committee talked over your email and Cindi Laurent (Vice Chair) gave these suggestions:

    Use the UEB ligature symbol for the undertie - dots 45, 235 - and do a TN to explain that it is under the word in print and replaces the print hyphen if there is one.
    For the letters above the tie, I would suggest putting them in parentheses and placing them after the 2nd letter of the tie (so for quan<b>d e</b>lle you would have q u a n bold symbol d ligature bold symbol e open paren t close paren lle). It's ugly, but it's all there.  You would also need a TN to explain that the letters that appear above the tie are enclosed in parens and follow the tied letters.  I'd probably omit the bold as I think it's just showing that those sounds are tied together and the ligature does that (in my opinion). And, of course, this suggestion is completely based on the the small snippet of the book we can see.
    Tough stuff!
    in reply to: French liaison of sound symbol #38340
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Jill,

    SO SORRY for this late reply, Jill. I didn't get an email notification that this was posted. I am looking into this and I hope to have some helpful answers in the coming days.

    Patrick

     

    in reply to: Accented letters in Italian #38337
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Robert,

    Whenever we find a symbol like this that is not on the WBU list for a certain language, it is best to use a transcriber-defined symbol such as dots 1456 in its place. Be sure to add it to your SS page.

    You can find this information on page 38 of "Rules of UEB."

    Patrick Janson

     

     

    in reply to: Hebrew Language Duxbury rules #37561
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Dawn,

    I got in touch with the only transcriber I know who is adept at Hebrew Braille. His reply is that he has no knowledge of any updated rules on Hebrew Language in Braille. He still utilizes the document "Provisional Guidance for Transcribing Foreign Language Materials". Sorry we can't help more!

    Patrick Janson

    in reply to: Foreign Language_Hindi Non-UEB Characters #37330
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    This reply came from FL Committee member, Anna Werner

    Hi Veeah, I'm on the foreign language committee.  This is not unlike Hebrew, which we took a look at recently.  What's happening here is that when a vowel follows a consonant, a mark (a "diacritic") is added to the consonant symbol to show the vowel, instead of writing the two sounds separately.  You can see all the diacritic marks here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devanagari#Vowel_diacritics .  This chart was also helpful to me: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devanagari#Vowels .  (Wikipedia is a great resource for understanding the basics of a foreign writing system.)

    The basic consonant symbols include a vowel sound, which is written as "a" or a schwa.  The second and third syllables in your song are like this; you just write the consonant symbol and the vowel is implied.  For the others, you need to identify the consonant and the diacritic in use.  The first syllable is "d" with a long i diacritic, so to braille, dots 145, 35

    The pronunciation line is not a transliteration line, so you may need to ignore it.  Between Wikipedia and the page from World Braille Usage, I was able to pretty confidently identify the symbols used.  Some of the diacritics were a little unclear because of the resolution of the image, so I hope you have a better copy to zoom in on.

    in reply to: Foreign Language_Hindi Non-UEB Characters #37306
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Good Morning. Veeah,

    I'm happy to look into this. I myself am a music braillist, so welcome to that club, too!

    Your message said, "The following song I have included..." but I don't see an attachment. Would you please be able to submit it so I can look over the modified characters?

    Patrick, Chair of the FL Committee

    in reply to: Foreign Language Switch Code Indicators #36654
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Jan,

    Code switch indicators in FL materials are only needed when context and format are not sufficient to let the reader know of a shift in language. They are rarely used. In most FL materials, difference of typeforms, inserting a colon, or indentations in format are enough. In cases where they are not, follow these guidelines as prescribed in The Rules of UEB, Section 14.2 and 14.3.

    Let me know if you need more specifics! If you attach a pdf, I would be able to help more.

    Patrick

     

     

     

    in reply to: Foreign Language within UEB context #36179
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Kimberly,

    I asked friend and FL expert Rebecca Sherwood to look this over with me, and we feel you have used the typeforms properly. Since we aren't using the typeform indicators from World Braille Usage, and we're not allowed to use UEB signs within the non-UEB Code Switch Indicators, the italics must go outside the Code Switch Indicators.

    Best,

    Patrick

    in reply to: Unidentified Foreign Language Modifier #36178
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Cindy,

    So sorry for the delayed response, but I will endeavor to answer. There is no official document for Latin braille alphabet and signs. It is the general belief that the intent behind the prohibition on hybridizing is for the main foreign language. As the Latin here is the secondary language, it is acceptable to use the UEB macron before the "o" in "persone".

    The rules are trying  to prevent the transcriber from combining UEB letter modifiers and foreign language code sign in a single language such as Spanish.

    Patrick

     

    in reply to: contractions in foreign language #35333
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Kim,

    Assuming you are using Method 1 (UEB Accents and Contractions in Anglicized Words), you would use the standard UEB contractions you might expect. I typed both words into Braille2000 to see what would happen. That gave me P(en)(sion)e and (St)azione. The "one" contraction did not appear in the second word, likely because of pronunciation. If you used "one" in the first word, it would result in one extra cell.

    I would go P(en)(sion)e and (St)azione.

    Be well,

    Patrick

    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Clara,

    Sorry for the delay, but I wanted to communicate with some committee members as a Foreign Language guidebook has yet to be published to handle such matters. Our consensus is:

    Since the book seems to be all in Spanish, the same rules apply to English and single letters: any letter such as "y" that can be misread as a word in Spanish should have a grade one indicator. So, yes on "y" and no on "x".

    Hope that helps!

    Patrick

    in reply to: Underlined Letter: Twi (Akan) Language #34826
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Somer.

    You have two choices in this case:

    1) You can use the "underline symbol indicator" (dots 456, 23) which tells the reader the following symbol is underlined in print.

    2) If you want to list it among other language symbols, you can create a transcriber-defined modifier, such as those found in Section 4.2 on page 42 of "Rules of UEB".

    Either way, please make sure you define the symbol you use as a modifier on the Special Symbols page. Hope that helped!

    Patrick

    in reply to: Distinguishing English in a Spanish Textbook #34038
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator

    Hi Carmen,

    Thanks for your patience. I consulted two other FL experts and we put our heads together. Our thoughts are these: for the TOC, if you are using the bold emphasis on the Spanish, it will be clear to the reader that the non-bold is English. If you didn’t want to use all the bold on Spanish sentences in the TOC, it would be permissible to reverse the emphasis and add it on the English terms. Either way, the emphasis in print (or the one you create) should make it clear to the reader.

    As for the accents in other “front matter” materials such as Author/Reviewer lists (oh, I guess you revised your question but I'll answer it anyway), we are suggesting you use UEB modifiers. The Spanish modifiers can be saved for reading/learning portions of the text.

    Best,

    Patrick

    in reply to: English textbook teaching Spanish #32899
    Patrick Janson
    Moderator
    Hi Cindi!
    A grade 1 indicator is not necessary because the foreign language is in grade 1, uncontracted braille as you mentioned. It should be clear to the reader that they are in uncontracted braille if the foreign words are distinguished either with a typeform indicator or the text specifically identifies the material as foreign, etc. It does not matter that the surrounding English words are in contracted braille. If there were superscript symbols after any English words, they would require the grade 1 symbol indicator. The use or non-use of the g1 symbol indicator is determined by the word to which it applies.
    Patrick, Foreign Language Chair
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