Lindy Walton

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  • in reply to: Adding & Subtracting Integers #21294
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Thank you Lindy for the quick response to my question. After reading your response I went back and looked at the problems closely and found that the negative and positive number signs were just slightly raised (almost non-detectable) so therefore I will go back and braille them as left superscripts. Also, in knowing that standardized test handle these numbers as superscripts is good information that will help me in the future when this situation comes up.

    Thanks again for your help!!!

    in reply to: Proper way to braille division worksheet #21292
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    The proper way to braille a division arrangement which contains only a divisor and a dividend composed entirely of numerals is simply this:

    [braille]#8O8

    This worksheet looks like a test or quiz so I suggest using the same layout as the print copy does--in three columns--since the problems are not numbered. I also suggest double spacing.

    in reply to: is the letter indicator required in -x #21277
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    It's always better to understand the rule than to copy an example. The rule to apply here is Section 27g of the Nemeth Code which states that the ELI must not be used with a letter which is not a "single letter." -x is not a single letter by definition (Section 25 defines "single letter") because it is not preceded by a space (Sec.25v). No ELI is used. The rule does not change if a period follows the -x because the x is still not preceded by a space. We often need to challenge our translation software because it cannot read in context. You are smart to question it and to understand its limitations.

    in reply to: synthetic division #21275
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Got it, and Lindy I really appreciate your quick response!

    in reply to: synthetic division #21274
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Right. Just copy what you see in print for that column you are eliminating -- no arrow to the ellipsis.

    in reply to: Grades 1 and 2 Math Braille #21266
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    [quote=Lindy]OK. Use the same print page numbers you see in the print copy. Continue braille page numbering as it falls consecutively. It may require a bit of software wrestling to get this to work! I see no guidance in our codebooks regarding the use/nonuse of a letter indicator for an alphabetic page number that has no number associated with it. I would use the letter indicator for the capitalized letters A B C and D, but not for the lettered continuation letter (if any). Like this (the colon represents a letter indicator; the period represents a capitalization indicator)

    :.A then a:.A then b:.A then :.B then a:.B etc.

    I welcome arguments.
    ( :[/quote]

    THANK YOU

    in reply to: Grades 1 and 2 Math Braille #21265
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    OK. Use the same print page numbers you see in the print copy. Continue braille page numbering as it falls consecutively. It may require a bit of software wrestling to get this to work! I see no guidance in our codebooks regarding the use/nonuse of a letter indicator for an alphabetic page number that has no number associated with it. I would use the letter indicator for the capitalized letters A B C and D, but not for the lettered continuation letter (if any). Like this (the colon represents a letter indicator; the period represents a capitalization indicator)

    :.A then a:.A then b:.A then :.B then a:.B etc.

    I welcome arguments.
    ( :

    in reply to: Grade 1 Math #21262
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Good morning.
    Number lines for grades K-3 must be drawn as a graphic.
    You will find excellent guidance for the production of number lines in the lower grades in the new GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FOR TACTILE GRAPHICS which you can view or download at this site:

    http://www.brailleauthority.org/tg/web-manual/index.html

    By searching for the keywords "number line" you will be able to learn all about it. Unit 6 gives the details of any number line; 6.5.1.12 gives requirements for grades K-3. Unit 11 further discusses graphics for early grades. Blue underlined links take you to illustrative examples.

    Let me know if you have further questions. Thanks for asking.

    in reply to: Crosshatch #21255
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Yes, you should follow print.
    Thanks for asking.

    in reply to: Decimal with Spatial Cancellation #21251
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Since the dollar sign and decimal point are not shown in the numbers above the cancelled part, the symbols are not included within the cancellation indicators.

    This will be a wide arrangement in braille -- I suggest showing the spatial arrangement first *without the cancellations. A TN should tell the reader that you are brailling it twice.

    I'm not sure why there is a zero there... are you?

    in reply to: Rectangle Sections Method for 4th grade division #21250
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Thank you for your quick response. For some reason i guess i was just over-thinking the problem and really should have gone with my first instinct to make it a graphic. Its always better to be certain though.
    thanks again

    in reply to: IPHONE and EMAIL #21235
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hello. Your first question regarding iPhone and eMail have been on my mind... In a Nemeth transcription, these are literary words--I would not consider the letters to be abbreviations because they are each part of the word. However, retaining the italics for the i and the e makes for a messy transcription in any code. I am wondering what the Literary experts would say about ignoring the italics for the i and the e. By stating on your Transcriber's Notes page that these letters are italicized in the print copy, you will be able to braille these two words without the emphasis.

    Your second question regarding book level: This is really a Braille Formats question but it is my understanding that when a level is indicated by graphics or colors, you are not to add a word (such as "Grade" or "Level") but simply insert a colon and then the Arabic numeral as you have done in your first example. This is according to Braille Formats (1997) Rule 2, Sec.2c3b.

    in reply to: abbreviation and hyphen #21240
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    Hello. I don't like the looks of this! If it is a worksheet, I might consider ignoring the hyphens. Otherwise, yes, you are correct that you should space after the first m and before the hyphen.

    in reply to: Nemeth Certification #21217
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    I would like to respond to this conversation regarding the Nemeth certification exam and the professional expectations of a transcriber seeking certification. First, I will summarize braille training and certification options available to us.

    The Literary Braille course published by the Library of Congress prepares one to take the Literary Braille certification exam which is the baseline certification for a transcriber. The literary braille certificate attests to the transcriber's ability to braille a library book, observing all the fundamental rules of the EBAE code. Library book formatting is taught as part of the literary course.

    Many transcribers continue their training in order to produce braille textbooks and to produce work that falls beyond the scope of the literary code--math, foreign language, music, computer, chemistry, tactile graphics. The Library of Congress offers certification for music and math; textbook formatting certification is available through NBA. These are advanced exams for advanced certificates.

    After passing the Braille Formats certification exam, a person has the tools to transcribe any kind of textbook at any level in any subject other than those covered by their own specific codes or guidelines (math, foreign language, music, computer, chemistry, tactile graphics). The rules of Braille Formats affect the transcription of textbooks brailled in any code, so long as there is not a specific contradictory rule in that other code . For example, Nemeth code has no specific rules for front matter, for headings, for literary lists, for boxed materials, or for tables. In these areas, as in certain others, the Braille Formats rules must be followed. When the Nemeth Code has a specific rule that contradicts Braille Formats, the Nemeth code rule must be followed. Examples of this include the formatting of itemized material, for displayed expressions, or for keying items in a table.

    "An Introduction to Braille Mathematics" is an advanced course, appropriate only for an experienced transcriber. Perhaps there should be a prerequisite of a Braille Formats certification before a student is allowed into the Nemeth course, but that is as highly impractical as it is unlikely. At one point in history, a Nemeth student had to prove two years of textbook experience before being allowed to begin the course. Time and situations changed that, but still there is an expectation that a student taking the Nemeth course knows Braille Formats. Only the formats specific to the Nemeth code are covered in the Nemeth course. If a student passes all sixteen lessons but does not know Braille Formats, he is unlikely to pass the exam--nor should he, since all math material is textbook in nature.

    Another point to understand is that a certification exam is not designed to be a teaching tool. The exam is testing the transcriber's ability to interpret and apply the braille codes and to understand the nature of the text in order to make logical formatting decisions. Errors are not specifically noted in the final report. When the code citations listed in the report are studied, the transcriber's problem-solving skills should lead her to understand and locate the infraction.

    Nemeth certification attests that the transcriber can transcribe any math and science textbook at any level. Because Nemeth certification is a green light for a transcriber to take on advanced textbook work in math, physics, chemistry and science, failure to understand the basics of textbook formatting is a good reason not to be certified. I am sure you will agree that it is most important that people who don't know how are not given a certificate that says that they do.
    edited by Lindy on 1/17/2012

    in reply to: Blank Lines in Linear/Spatial arrangement #21203
    Lindy Walton
    Moderator

    This will be a quick reply as I am away from my computer and resources but note that cancellations in fractions need not be spatially arranged when following the Chemistry Code. You may braille these fractions linearly.

    [Note that *if you were to braille them spatially, the numerators should be centered over the fraction line.]

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 306 total)